You are here

Diplomacy & Defense Think Tank News

Toward the sustainability state? Conceptualizing national sustainability institutions and their impact on policy-making

The achievement of global sustainability and climate objectives rests on their incorporation into policy-making at the level of nation-states. Against this background, governments around the world have created various specialized sustainability institutions - councils, committees, ombudspersons, among others -in order to promote these agendas and their implementation. However, sustainability institutions have remained undertheorized and their impact on policy-making is empirically unclear. In this paper, we develop a conceptual framework for sustainability institutions and systematically explore their potential impact on more sustainable policy-making. We define sustainability institutions as public, trans-departmental and permanent national bodies with an integrated understanding of sustainability that considers socio-ecological well-being, global contexts and a future-orientation. Drawing on literature on sustainability and long-term governance as well as on illustrative case examples, we propose conducive conditions and pathways through which sustainability institutions may influence policy-making. As conducive, we assume sustainability institutions' embodiment of sustainability governance principles as well as their authority, a strong legal basis, resources, and autonomy. Further, we outline how sustainability institutions can influence policy-making based on their roles in the public policy process. We conclude that the increasing prevalence of national sustainability institutions indicates an ongoing shift from the environmental state toward a more comprehensive sustainability state. However, sustainability institutions can only be one building block of the sustainability state out of many, and their potential to reorient political decision-making effectively toward the socio-ecological transformation hinges upon individual design features such as their mandate, resources and authority, as well as on the specific governance context.

Toward the sustainability state? Conceptualizing national sustainability institutions and their impact on policy-making

The achievement of global sustainability and climate objectives rests on their incorporation into policy-making at the level of nation-states. Against this background, governments around the world have created various specialized sustainability institutions - councils, committees, ombudspersons, among others -in order to promote these agendas and their implementation. However, sustainability institutions have remained undertheorized and their impact on policy-making is empirically unclear. In this paper, we develop a conceptual framework for sustainability institutions and systematically explore their potential impact on more sustainable policy-making. We define sustainability institutions as public, trans-departmental and permanent national bodies with an integrated understanding of sustainability that considers socio-ecological well-being, global contexts and a future-orientation. Drawing on literature on sustainability and long-term governance as well as on illustrative case examples, we propose conducive conditions and pathways through which sustainability institutions may influence policy-making. As conducive, we assume sustainability institutions' embodiment of sustainability governance principles as well as their authority, a strong legal basis, resources, and autonomy. Further, we outline how sustainability institutions can influence policy-making based on their roles in the public policy process. We conclude that the increasing prevalence of national sustainability institutions indicates an ongoing shift from the environmental state toward a more comprehensive sustainability state. However, sustainability institutions can only be one building block of the sustainability state out of many, and their potential to reorient political decision-making effectively toward the socio-ecological transformation hinges upon individual design features such as their mandate, resources and authority, as well as on the specific governance context.

Mitarbeiter*in Drittmittelverwaltung (w/m/div)

Die Serviceabteilung Drittmittelmanagement unterteilt sich in die Bereiche Projektkoordination und Drittmittelverwaltung und verantwortet den Drittmittelhaushalt. Im Bereich der Projektkoordination werden den Wissenschaftler*innen die Fördermöglichkeiten aufgezeigt, die Drittmittelstrategie des DIW Berlin weiterentwickelt und die Projektleiter*innen bei ihren Projektanträgen fachlich strukturell begleitet. Die Drittmittelverwaltung übernimmt das Controlling der Projektbudgets, kommuniziert in allen finanziellen Angelegenheiten mit den Projektleiter*innen und Zuwendungsgeber*innen und übernimmt die Drittmittelplanung. Der Drittmittelhaushalt erwirtschaftete im Jahr 2020 14,3 Mio. €.

Die Serviceabteilung Drittmittelmanagement sucht zum nächstmöglichen Zeitpunkt eine*n Mitarbeiter*in Drittmittelverwaltung (w/m/div) (Vollzeit mit 39 Stunden pro Woche, Teilzeit ist möglich) für die Abwicklung aller mit nationalen und internationalen Drittmittelprojekten verbundenen administrativen Aufgaben und Prozesse von der Antragsphase bis zur Abrechnung.


Refugee policy and selective implementation of the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework in Kenya

Kenya’s refugee policy has morphed over time due to factors that include security threats, regional geo-politics and strategic interests. This policy brief addresses the relevance of national and regional geo-strategic interests for refugee policy in Kenya. It provides a historical overview of refugee policy in the country, highlighting the factors that account for policy fluctuations, contradictions and differential treatment of refugees hosted in Kenya, which is one of the pilot countries for the implementation of the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF). For policy-makers seeking to localise international refugee governance frameworks, it is important to situate frameworks such as the CRRF within the relevant national contexts because refugee hosting does not take place in a political vacuum or an ahistorical context (Jaji, 2022).
Kenya is an interesting case study because the contra-dictions in its refugee policy take a bifurcated approach, in which it has approved the implementation of the CRRF’s main objective to promote refugees’ self-reliance in north-western Kenya, where it hosts the mainly South Sudanese refugees in Kakuma camp and simultaneously put on hold the implementation of the same in the north-east in Dadaab camp, which predominantly hosts Somali refugees.
Over the years, the government of Kenya has threatened to close the two camps, the most recent threat being in April 2021, when it announced that it wanted UNHCR to re-patriate refugees within 14 days. Although the imple-mentation of KISEDP made closure of Kakuma refugee camp a logical course of action, the non-implementation of GISEDP in Garissa County raised concern in humanitarian circles regarding the fate of Somali refugees if Dadaab camp were to be closed without an integrated settlement similar to Kalobeyei.
The geo-political context accounts for the policy dis-crepancies and ambivalence evident in how the Kenyan
government has implemented the CRRF in Turkana County but not in Garissa. The complex relations between Kenya and Somalia are salient for the implementation of the CRRF in Garissa County, where the majority of Somali refugees in Kenya are hosted. Kenya and Somalia are locked in a maritime border dispute, which cannot be overlooked in trying to understand Kenya’s policy towards Somali refugees. The government of Kenya views Somalis as a threat to national security and blames them for the terrorist attacks in the country. Based on an analysis of these factors, we offer the following recommendations:
• International processes such as the CRRF should be sensitive to the security and geo-political interests of host countries. Security issues between Kenya and Somalia have a uniquely negative impact on Somali refugees in Kenya, which makes humanitarian operations harder to implement in Garissa County.
UNHCR and its partner organisations and funders should:
• encourage Kenya to implement GISEDP and provide sustained financial contributions under burden-sharing, which would provide more incentives for Kenya to remain committed to implementing the CRRF.
• clearly present the economic benefits of implementing the CRRF in terms of promoting self-reliance not only for the refugees, but also for Kenyans in both Turkana and Garissa counties.
• maintain support for Kenya’s efforts to engender self-reliance for refugees in north-western Kenya and commend the country for implementing the CRRF under KISEDP while also remaining aware of Kenya’s securi-tisation of Somali refugees in north-eastern Kenya.
• consider the insights from Kenya in addressing con-textual issues in other host countries that have agreed to implement the CRRF.

Refugee policy and selective implementation of the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework in Kenya

Kenya’s refugee policy has morphed over time due to factors that include security threats, regional geo-politics and strategic interests. This policy brief addresses the relevance of national and regional geo-strategic interests for refugee policy in Kenya. It provides a historical overview of refugee policy in the country, highlighting the factors that account for policy fluctuations, contradictions and differential treatment of refugees hosted in Kenya, which is one of the pilot countries for the implementation of the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF). For policy-makers seeking to localise international refugee governance frameworks, it is important to situate frameworks such as the CRRF within the relevant national contexts because refugee hosting does not take place in a political vacuum or an ahistorical context (Jaji, 2022).
Kenya is an interesting case study because the contra-dictions in its refugee policy take a bifurcated approach, in which it has approved the implementation of the CRRF’s main objective to promote refugees’ self-reliance in north-western Kenya, where it hosts the mainly South Sudanese refugees in Kakuma camp and simultaneously put on hold the implementation of the same in the north-east in Dadaab camp, which predominantly hosts Somali refugees.
Over the years, the government of Kenya has threatened to close the two camps, the most recent threat being in April 2021, when it announced that it wanted UNHCR to re-patriate refugees within 14 days. Although the imple-mentation of KISEDP made closure of Kakuma refugee camp a logical course of action, the non-implementation of GISEDP in Garissa County raised concern in humanitarian circles regarding the fate of Somali refugees if Dadaab camp were to be closed without an integrated settlement similar to Kalobeyei.
The geo-political context accounts for the policy dis-crepancies and ambivalence evident in how the Kenyan
government has implemented the CRRF in Turkana County but not in Garissa. The complex relations between Kenya and Somalia are salient for the implementation of the CRRF in Garissa County, where the majority of Somali refugees in Kenya are hosted. Kenya and Somalia are locked in a maritime border dispute, which cannot be overlooked in trying to understand Kenya’s policy towards Somali refugees. The government of Kenya views Somalis as a threat to national security and blames them for the terrorist attacks in the country. Based on an analysis of these factors, we offer the following recommendations:
• International processes such as the CRRF should be sensitive to the security and geo-political interests of host countries. Security issues between Kenya and Somalia have a uniquely negative impact on Somali refugees in Kenya, which makes humanitarian operations harder to implement in Garissa County.
UNHCR and its partner organisations and funders should:
• encourage Kenya to implement GISEDP and provide sustained financial contributions under burden-sharing, which would provide more incentives for Kenya to remain committed to implementing the CRRF.
• clearly present the economic benefits of implementing the CRRF in terms of promoting self-reliance not only for the refugees, but also for Kenyans in both Turkana and Garissa counties.
• maintain support for Kenya’s efforts to engender self-reliance for refugees in north-western Kenya and commend the country for implementing the CRRF under KISEDP while also remaining aware of Kenya’s securi-tisation of Somali refugees in north-eastern Kenya.
• consider the insights from Kenya in addressing con-textual issues in other host countries that have agreed to implement the CRRF.

Refugee policy and selective implementation of the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework in Kenya

Kenya’s refugee policy has morphed over time due to factors that include security threats, regional geo-politics and strategic interests. This policy brief addresses the relevance of national and regional geo-strategic interests for refugee policy in Kenya. It provides a historical overview of refugee policy in the country, highlighting the factors that account for policy fluctuations, contradictions and differential treatment of refugees hosted in Kenya, which is one of the pilot countries for the implementation of the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework (CRRF). For policy-makers seeking to localise international refugee governance frameworks, it is important to situate frameworks such as the CRRF within the relevant national contexts because refugee hosting does not take place in a political vacuum or an ahistorical context (Jaji, 2022).
Kenya is an interesting case study because the contra-dictions in its refugee policy take a bifurcated approach, in which it has approved the implementation of the CRRF’s main objective to promote refugees’ self-reliance in north-western Kenya, where it hosts the mainly South Sudanese refugees in Kakuma camp and simultaneously put on hold the implementation of the same in the north-east in Dadaab camp, which predominantly hosts Somali refugees.
Over the years, the government of Kenya has threatened to close the two camps, the most recent threat being in April 2021, when it announced that it wanted UNHCR to re-patriate refugees within 14 days. Although the imple-mentation of KISEDP made closure of Kakuma refugee camp a logical course of action, the non-implementation of GISEDP in Garissa County raised concern in humanitarian circles regarding the fate of Somali refugees if Dadaab camp were to be closed without an integrated settlement similar to Kalobeyei.
The geo-political context accounts for the policy dis-crepancies and ambivalence evident in how the Kenyan
government has implemented the CRRF in Turkana County but not in Garissa. The complex relations between Kenya and Somalia are salient for the implementation of the CRRF in Garissa County, where the majority of Somali refugees in Kenya are hosted. Kenya and Somalia are locked in a maritime border dispute, which cannot be overlooked in trying to understand Kenya’s policy towards Somali refugees. The government of Kenya views Somalis as a threat to national security and blames them for the terrorist attacks in the country. Based on an analysis of these factors, we offer the following recommendations:
• International processes such as the CRRF should be sensitive to the security and geo-political interests of host countries. Security issues between Kenya and Somalia have a uniquely negative impact on Somali refugees in Kenya, which makes humanitarian operations harder to implement in Garissa County.
UNHCR and its partner organisations and funders should:
• encourage Kenya to implement GISEDP and provide sustained financial contributions under burden-sharing, which would provide more incentives for Kenya to remain committed to implementing the CRRF.
• clearly present the economic benefits of implementing the CRRF in terms of promoting self-reliance not only for the refugees, but also for Kenyans in both Turkana and Garissa counties.
• maintain support for Kenya’s efforts to engender self-reliance for refugees in north-western Kenya and commend the country for implementing the CRRF under KISEDP while also remaining aware of Kenya’s securi-tisation of Somali refugees in north-eastern Kenya.
• consider the insights from Kenya in addressing con-textual issues in other host countries that have agreed to implement the CRRF.

Wiederaufbau in der Ukraine: Wie die EU die Ukraine unterstützen sollte

Russlands brutaler Angriffskrieg auf die Ukraine hat katastrophale Folgen für das Land. Zwar ist aktuell kein Ende des Krieges in Sicht, doch ist bereits absehbar, dass es enormer internationaler Anstrengungen bedürfen wird, um die Ukraine beim Wiederaufbau zu unterstützen. Auf der Ukraine Recovery Conference im Juli stellte die ukrainische Regierung einen nationalen Wiederaufbauplan vor, der eine tiefgreifende Modernisierung des Landes vorsieht.
Die Prioritäten, die die ukrainische Regierung für den Wiederaufbau setzt, lassen sich gut mit dem Ziel der Europäischen Union (EU) vereinbaren, die Ukraine fit für einen EU-Beitritt zu machen und den grünen und digitalen Wandel des Landes voranzutreiben. Die EU ist ihrerseits bereit, einen großen Teil der für den Wiederaufbau der Ukraine erforderlichen internationalen Anstrengungen zu stemmen. Allerdings muss die EU, will sie beim langfristigen Wiederaufbau der Ukraine eine starke Führungsrolle übernehmen, genauso viel Einigkeit und Entschlossenheit zeigen wie zu Kriegsbeginn.
Um eine nachhaltige Grundlage für den Wiederaufbau der Ukraine zu schaffen, müssen die EU und die Mitgliedstaaten humanitäre Ad-hoc-Hilfe mit verlässlichen, langfristigen Wiederaufbaumaßnahmen kombinieren. Dabei sollten sie die folgenden zentralen Empfehlungen berücksichtigen:
Einen zweistufigen Ansatz für den Wiederaufbau verfolgen
Die Modernisierung und Vorbereitung der Ukraine für einen EU-Beitritt werden mehrere Jahre dauern. Gleichzeitig müssen die enormen Infrastrukturverluste in der Ukraine dringend behoben werden, am besten noch vor dem Wintereinbruch. Daher sollten die internationalen Geber dem Wiederaufbau der kritischen Infrastruktur Vorrang einräumen, wie etwa Schulen, Krankenhäusern, Wohnungen, Stromnetzen und Straßen. In einer zweiten Phase sollten umfassendere Modernisierungsmaßnahmen und institutionelle Reformen für einen EU-Beitritt folgen.
Geeignete Steuerungsmechanismen für den Wiederaufbau einrichten
Die ukrainische Regierung und die EU sollten eine Koordinierungsplattform einrichten, an der auch andere internationale Partner und Akteure der ukrainischen Zivilgesellschaft beteiligt sind. Sie sollte dazu dienen, institutionelle Mechanismen zur Steuerung und Überwachung der Projekte zu entwickeln, und eine enge Koordinierung zwischen der ukrainischen Regierung und internationalen Partnern ermöglichen.
Ein umfassendes Abkommen über den Beitrag der EU zum Wiederaufbau der Ukraine aushandeln
Es braucht zeitnah ein Abkommen über die Steuerung und Finanzierung der langfristigen EU-Hilfe für die Ukraine. Möglich wäre eine kombinierte Strategie, die eine gemeinsame Kreditaufnahme durch die EU und zusätzliche Beiträge der Mitgliedstaaten zum EU-Haushalt umfasst. Darüber hinaus sollte die EU zügig rechtliche Wege prüfen, um eingefrorene russische Vermögenswerte für den Wiederaufbau der Ukraine einzusetzen.
Die Militärhilfe für die Ukraine fortsetzen und ausweiten
Umfangreiche Investitionen in den Wiederaufbau der Ukraine dürfen nicht zu Lasten der notwendigen Militärhilfe gehen. Zuallererst sollte die Ukraine dabei unterstützt werden, ihren Luftraum gegen russische Raketen­angriffe zu verteidigen. Darüber hinaus sollte die EU ihre Pläne für eine militärische Ausbildungsmission verwirklichen, vorausgesetzt, sie schafft einen echten Mehrwert zu den bestehenden Bemühungen und entspricht dem ukrainischen Bedarf.

Wiederaufbau in der Ukraine: Wie die EU die Ukraine unterstützen sollte

Russlands brutaler Angriffskrieg auf die Ukraine hat katastrophale Folgen für das Land. Zwar ist aktuell kein Ende des Krieges in Sicht, doch ist bereits absehbar, dass es enormer internationaler Anstrengungen bedürfen wird, um die Ukraine beim Wiederaufbau zu unterstützen. Auf der Ukraine Recovery Conference im Juli stellte die ukrainische Regierung einen nationalen Wiederaufbauplan vor, der eine tiefgreifende Modernisierung des Landes vorsieht.
Die Prioritäten, die die ukrainische Regierung für den Wiederaufbau setzt, lassen sich gut mit dem Ziel der Europäischen Union (EU) vereinbaren, die Ukraine fit für einen EU-Beitritt zu machen und den grünen und digitalen Wandel des Landes voranzutreiben. Die EU ist ihrerseits bereit, einen großen Teil der für den Wiederaufbau der Ukraine erforderlichen internationalen Anstrengungen zu stemmen. Allerdings muss die EU, will sie beim langfristigen Wiederaufbau der Ukraine eine starke Führungsrolle übernehmen, genauso viel Einigkeit und Entschlossenheit zeigen wie zu Kriegsbeginn.
Um eine nachhaltige Grundlage für den Wiederaufbau der Ukraine zu schaffen, müssen die EU und die Mitgliedstaaten humanitäre Ad-hoc-Hilfe mit verlässlichen, langfristigen Wiederaufbaumaßnahmen kombinieren. Dabei sollten sie die folgenden zentralen Empfehlungen berücksichtigen:
Einen zweistufigen Ansatz für den Wiederaufbau verfolgen
Die Modernisierung und Vorbereitung der Ukraine für einen EU-Beitritt werden mehrere Jahre dauern. Gleichzeitig müssen die enormen Infrastrukturverluste in der Ukraine dringend behoben werden, am besten noch vor dem Wintereinbruch. Daher sollten die internationalen Geber dem Wiederaufbau der kritischen Infrastruktur Vorrang einräumen, wie etwa Schulen, Krankenhäusern, Wohnungen, Stromnetzen und Straßen. In einer zweiten Phase sollten umfassendere Modernisierungsmaßnahmen und institutionelle Reformen für einen EU-Beitritt folgen.
Geeignete Steuerungsmechanismen für den Wiederaufbau einrichten
Die ukrainische Regierung und die EU sollten eine Koordinierungsplattform einrichten, an der auch andere internationale Partner und Akteure der ukrainischen Zivilgesellschaft beteiligt sind. Sie sollte dazu dienen, institutionelle Mechanismen zur Steuerung und Überwachung der Projekte zu entwickeln, und eine enge Koordinierung zwischen der ukrainischen Regierung und internationalen Partnern ermöglichen.
Ein umfassendes Abkommen über den Beitrag der EU zum Wiederaufbau der Ukraine aushandeln
Es braucht zeitnah ein Abkommen über die Steuerung und Finanzierung der langfristigen EU-Hilfe für die Ukraine. Möglich wäre eine kombinierte Strategie, die eine gemeinsame Kreditaufnahme durch die EU und zusätzliche Beiträge der Mitgliedstaaten zum EU-Haushalt umfasst. Darüber hinaus sollte die EU zügig rechtliche Wege prüfen, um eingefrorene russische Vermögenswerte für den Wiederaufbau der Ukraine einzusetzen.
Die Militärhilfe für die Ukraine fortsetzen und ausweiten
Umfangreiche Investitionen in den Wiederaufbau der Ukraine dürfen nicht zu Lasten der notwendigen Militärhilfe gehen. Zuallererst sollte die Ukraine dabei unterstützt werden, ihren Luftraum gegen russische Raketen­angriffe zu verteidigen. Darüber hinaus sollte die EU ihre Pläne für eine militärische Ausbildungsmission verwirklichen, vorausgesetzt, sie schafft einen echten Mehrwert zu den bestehenden Bemühungen und entspricht dem ukrainischen Bedarf.

Wiederaufbau in der Ukraine: Wie die EU die Ukraine unterstützen sollte

Russlands brutaler Angriffskrieg auf die Ukraine hat katastrophale Folgen für das Land. Zwar ist aktuell kein Ende des Krieges in Sicht, doch ist bereits absehbar, dass es enormer internationaler Anstrengungen bedürfen wird, um die Ukraine beim Wiederaufbau zu unterstützen. Auf der Ukraine Recovery Conference im Juli stellte die ukrainische Regierung einen nationalen Wiederaufbauplan vor, der eine tiefgreifende Modernisierung des Landes vorsieht.
Die Prioritäten, die die ukrainische Regierung für den Wiederaufbau setzt, lassen sich gut mit dem Ziel der Europäischen Union (EU) vereinbaren, die Ukraine fit für einen EU-Beitritt zu machen und den grünen und digitalen Wandel des Landes voranzutreiben. Die EU ist ihrerseits bereit, einen großen Teil der für den Wiederaufbau der Ukraine erforderlichen internationalen Anstrengungen zu stemmen. Allerdings muss die EU, will sie beim langfristigen Wiederaufbau der Ukraine eine starke Führungsrolle übernehmen, genauso viel Einigkeit und Entschlossenheit zeigen wie zu Kriegsbeginn.
Um eine nachhaltige Grundlage für den Wiederaufbau der Ukraine zu schaffen, müssen die EU und die Mitgliedstaaten humanitäre Ad-hoc-Hilfe mit verlässlichen, langfristigen Wiederaufbaumaßnahmen kombinieren. Dabei sollten sie die folgenden zentralen Empfehlungen berücksichtigen:
Einen zweistufigen Ansatz für den Wiederaufbau verfolgen
Die Modernisierung und Vorbereitung der Ukraine für einen EU-Beitritt werden mehrere Jahre dauern. Gleichzeitig müssen die enormen Infrastrukturverluste in der Ukraine dringend behoben werden, am besten noch vor dem Wintereinbruch. Daher sollten die internationalen Geber dem Wiederaufbau der kritischen Infrastruktur Vorrang einräumen, wie etwa Schulen, Krankenhäusern, Wohnungen, Stromnetzen und Straßen. In einer zweiten Phase sollten umfassendere Modernisierungsmaßnahmen und institutionelle Reformen für einen EU-Beitritt folgen.
Geeignete Steuerungsmechanismen für den Wiederaufbau einrichten
Die ukrainische Regierung und die EU sollten eine Koordinierungsplattform einrichten, an der auch andere internationale Partner und Akteure der ukrainischen Zivilgesellschaft beteiligt sind. Sie sollte dazu dienen, institutionelle Mechanismen zur Steuerung und Überwachung der Projekte zu entwickeln, und eine enge Koordinierung zwischen der ukrainischen Regierung und internationalen Partnern ermöglichen.
Ein umfassendes Abkommen über den Beitrag der EU zum Wiederaufbau der Ukraine aushandeln
Es braucht zeitnah ein Abkommen über die Steuerung und Finanzierung der langfristigen EU-Hilfe für die Ukraine. Möglich wäre eine kombinierte Strategie, die eine gemeinsame Kreditaufnahme durch die EU und zusätzliche Beiträge der Mitgliedstaaten zum EU-Haushalt umfasst. Darüber hinaus sollte die EU zügig rechtliche Wege prüfen, um eingefrorene russische Vermögenswerte für den Wiederaufbau der Ukraine einzusetzen.
Die Militärhilfe für die Ukraine fortsetzen und ausweiten
Umfangreiche Investitionen in den Wiederaufbau der Ukraine dürfen nicht zu Lasten der notwendigen Militärhilfe gehen. Zuallererst sollte die Ukraine dabei unterstützt werden, ihren Luftraum gegen russische Raketen­angriffe zu verteidigen. Darüber hinaus sollte die EU ihre Pläne für eine militärische Ausbildungsmission verwirklichen, vorausgesetzt, sie schafft einen echten Mehrwert zu den bestehenden Bemühungen und entspricht dem ukrainischen Bedarf.

Hohe Zustimmung für Klimageld – vor allem bei Personen mit großen Sorgen um die eigene wirtschaftliche Situation

Zusammenfassung:

Ein Klimageld als sozialer Kompensationsmechanismus zur CO2-Bepreisung gehört zu den Kernprojekten der Ampel-Regierung, um die Akzeptanz des Marktsystems zu gewährleisten. Zuletzt wurde die Erhöhung der CO2-Bepreisung im Rahmen des dritten Entlastungspaket bis 2024 allerdings ausgesetzt. Eine repräsentative Befragung zeigt jetzt, dass rund drei Viertel der deutschen wahlberechtigten Personen mit Onlinezugang einem Klimageld als monatliche Pro-Kopf-Erstattung für alle Bürger*innen zustimmen. Ähnlich viele Menschen stimmen einer Erhöhung der sogenannten Pendlerpauschale zu, mit der Arbeitswege steuerlich abgeschrieben werden können. Vertiefende Analysen zeigen, dass vor allem Menschen, die sich um die eigene wirtschaftliche Situation sorgen, das Klimageld unterstützen.


Does economic growth reduce multidimensional poverty? Evidence from low- and middle-income countries

The long-standing tradition of empirical studies investigating the nexus between economic growth and poverty concentrates mainly on monetary poverty. In contrast, little is known about the relationship between economic growth and multidimensional poverty. Consequently, this study seeks to assess the elasticity of multidimensional poverty to growth, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The study employs two novel, individual-based multidimensional poverty indices: the G-CSPI and the G-M0. It relies on an unbalanced panel dataset of 91 low- and middle-income countries observed between 1990 and 2018: this is thus far the largest sample and the longest time span used in the literature to address this research question. Within a regression framework, we estimate the growth elasticity of multidimensional poverty using the first difference estimator. Our study finds that the growth elasticity of multidimensional poverty is −0.46 while using the G-CSPI and −0.35 while using the G-M0: this means that a 10% increase in GDP decreases the multidimensional poverty by approximately 4–5%. There is, however, heterogeneity in the results; in particular, the elasticity is higher in the second sub-period (2001–2018) and for countries with lower initial levels of poverty. Furthermore, a comparative analysis reveals that the elasticity of income-poverty to growth is five to eight times higher than that of multidimensional poverty. In conclusion, our results indicate that economic growth is an important instrument to alleviate multidimensional poverty, but its effect is substantially lower than that on monetary poverty. Therefore, future research should identify other factors and policies, such as social policies, to substantially reduce multidimensional poverty.

Does economic growth reduce multidimensional poverty? Evidence from low- and middle-income countries

The long-standing tradition of empirical studies investigating the nexus between economic growth and poverty concentrates mainly on monetary poverty. In contrast, little is known about the relationship between economic growth and multidimensional poverty. Consequently, this study seeks to assess the elasticity of multidimensional poverty to growth, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The study employs two novel, individual-based multidimensional poverty indices: the G-CSPI and the G-M0. It relies on an unbalanced panel dataset of 91 low- and middle-income countries observed between 1990 and 2018: this is thus far the largest sample and the longest time span used in the literature to address this research question. Within a regression framework, we estimate the growth elasticity of multidimensional poverty using the first difference estimator. Our study finds that the growth elasticity of multidimensional poverty is −0.46 while using the G-CSPI and −0.35 while using the G-M0: this means that a 10% increase in GDP decreases the multidimensional poverty by approximately 4–5%. There is, however, heterogeneity in the results; in particular, the elasticity is higher in the second sub-period (2001–2018) and for countries with lower initial levels of poverty. Furthermore, a comparative analysis reveals that the elasticity of income-poverty to growth is five to eight times higher than that of multidimensional poverty. In conclusion, our results indicate that economic growth is an important instrument to alleviate multidimensional poverty, but its effect is substantially lower than that on monetary poverty. Therefore, future research should identify other factors and policies, such as social policies, to substantially reduce multidimensional poverty.

Does economic growth reduce multidimensional poverty? Evidence from low- and middle-income countries

The long-standing tradition of empirical studies investigating the nexus between economic growth and poverty concentrates mainly on monetary poverty. In contrast, little is known about the relationship between economic growth and multidimensional poverty. Consequently, this study seeks to assess the elasticity of multidimensional poverty to growth, especially in low- and middle-income countries. The study employs two novel, individual-based multidimensional poverty indices: the G-CSPI and the G-M0. It relies on an unbalanced panel dataset of 91 low- and middle-income countries observed between 1990 and 2018: this is thus far the largest sample and the longest time span used in the literature to address this research question. Within a regression framework, we estimate the growth elasticity of multidimensional poverty using the first difference estimator. Our study finds that the growth elasticity of multidimensional poverty is −0.46 while using the G-CSPI and −0.35 while using the G-M0: this means that a 10% increase in GDP decreases the multidimensional poverty by approximately 4–5%. There is, however, heterogeneity in the results; in particular, the elasticity is higher in the second sub-period (2001–2018) and for countries with lower initial levels of poverty. Furthermore, a comparative analysis reveals that the elasticity of income-poverty to growth is five to eight times higher than that of multidimensional poverty. In conclusion, our results indicate that economic growth is an important instrument to alleviate multidimensional poverty, but its effect is substantially lower than that on monetary poverty. Therefore, future research should identify other factors and policies, such as social policies, to substantially reduce multidimensional poverty.

Voluntary sustainability standards and the Sustainable Development Goals

The report discusses the role of VSS in advancing the sustainability agenda in developing countries and assesses the opportunities and challenges associated with VSS uptake in those countries. The report thus examines the opportunities VSS offer for developing countries, and their role in advancing the environmental, social, and economic sustainability agenda in those countries. The report also presents the challenges that developing countries face regarding VSS uptake and use; based on the above, the report distills policy implications that could provide guidance to researchers and policymakers.

Voluntary sustainability standards and the Sustainable Development Goals

The report discusses the role of VSS in advancing the sustainability agenda in developing countries and assesses the opportunities and challenges associated with VSS uptake in those countries. The report thus examines the opportunities VSS offer for developing countries, and their role in advancing the environmental, social, and economic sustainability agenda in those countries. The report also presents the challenges that developing countries face regarding VSS uptake and use; based on the above, the report distills policy implications that could provide guidance to researchers and policymakers.

Voluntary sustainability standards and the Sustainable Development Goals

The report discusses the role of VSS in advancing the sustainability agenda in developing countries and assesses the opportunities and challenges associated with VSS uptake in those countries. The report thus examines the opportunities VSS offer for developing countries, and their role in advancing the environmental, social, and economic sustainability agenda in those countries. The report also presents the challenges that developing countries face regarding VSS uptake and use; based on the above, the report distills policy implications that could provide guidance to researchers and policymakers.

Eine langfristige Perspektive für die aktuelle Energiekrise

Bonn, 17. Oktober 2022. Inmitten der sich zuspitzenden Krisen, wie dem Ukraine-Krieg, COVID-19 und dem Klimawandel, wird deutlich, wie schwierig es für Regierungen ist, kurzfristige mit langfristigen Prioritäten in Einklang zu bringen. Einerseits machen diese Krisen deutlich, dass ein Übergang zu einer nachhaltigen Wirtschaft und sozialer Gerechtigkeit notwendig ist. Das Konzept der „gerechten Übergänge“ hat an Zugkraft gewonnen, einschließlich der Debatten auf G7-Gipfeln und Klimakonferenzen über Partnerschaften für gerechte Energieübergänge und Klimaclubs. Andererseits scheinen die Prioritäten zur Energiesicherheit einer ehrgeizigen Klimapolitik entgegenzustehen, und die befürworteten Preissubventionen und -obergrenzen können die Verringerung des Verbrauchs fossiler Brennstoffe und der Energienachfrage insgesamt einschränken.

Reformen der Kohlenstoffbepreisung könnten die Kohärenz zwischen den derzeitigen Maßnahmen zur Bewältigung der Energiekrise und längerfristigen Ansätzen verbessern, also kurzfristige Maßnahmen mit dem gerechten Übergangsprozess verbinden. Eine Reform der Kohlenstoffbepreisung kombiniert zwei Komponenten: die Bepreisung von Kohlenstoffemissionen, einschließlich der Abschaffung von Subventionen für fossile Energieträger, die umweltschädlichem Verhalten entgegenwirken, sowie die Verwendung der erzielten Einnahmen. Eine vielversprechende Möglichkeit, die Einnahmen zu verwenden, sind Sozialprogramme, die die Menschen während des Übergangsprozesses vor höheren Preisen schützen. Derzeitige Maßnahmen zur Bewältigung der Energiekrise nutzen auch Transfers an Haushalte, um Preissteigerungen abzufedern. Aktuelle Untersuchungen zeigen, dass selbst bei den derzeitigen Energiepreiserhöhungen die Einführung von Kohlenstoffpreisen und die Umverteilung der Einnahmen an die Haushalte den Wohlstand im Vergleich zu einer Situation mit stabilisierten Preisen erhöhen würde. Gezielte Transfers würden bedürftigen Haushalten helfen und gleichzeitig Anreize zur Emissionsreduzierung bei den Reichsten schaffen, da die reichsten 10 % der Weltbevölkerung 50 % der globalen Emissionen ausstoßen. Transfers an Haushalte sind daher von entscheidender Bedeutung. Erkenntnisse zur Kohlenstoffpreisgestaltung bieten eine Orientierung, wie diese umgesetzt werden können.

Erstens sollten die Regierungen bei ihren Umverteilungsstrategien auf bestehende Armut und Ungleichheiten sowie auf politökonomische Hindernisse eingehen. Während der Energiekrise haben die Regierungen sowohl universelle Preismaßnahmen wie Obergrenzen und Subventionen für Gaspreise als auch Transfers an alle Bürger*innen oder gezieltere Unterstützung für die schwächsten Bevölkerungsschichten eingesetzt. Die Denkfabrik Bruegel stellt fest, dass alle europäischen Länder mit Ausnahme von Ungarn gezielte Unterstützung für gefährdete Gruppen bereitstellten. Wie Studien über die öffentliche Akzeptanz von Klimapolitik und Kohlenstoffpreisen verdeutlichen, beeinflusst die Wahrnehmung von Fairness den Erfolg und die Auswirkungen von Maßnahmen. Die Energiekrise zeigt jedoch, dass es für Regierungen schwierig ist, gefährdete Gruppen während großer Schocks zu identifizieren. Darüber hinaus müssen politisch-ökonomische Hindernisse überwunden werden, insbesondere, wenn auch wichtige Interessengruppen wie Energieversorger, der Privatsektor und Haushalte mit höherem Einkommen angesprochen werden sollen. Gezielte Transfers an ärmere Haushalte könnten steuerlichen Spielraum freisetzen, um diese anderen wichtigen Akteure zu unterstützen.

Zentral ist auch eine klare Kommunikation darüber, welche Ziele und beabsichtigten Wirkungen Sozialtransfers haben sollen. Die Bürger*innen müssen verstehen, welche Leistungen sie von der Regierung erhalten können und wie die Transfers die Verteilungsgerechtigkeit verbessern und sozial schwachen Haushalten zugutekommen. In der Vergangenheit stießen die Vorteile der Kohlendioxidsteuerreform auf mangelnde öffentliche Wahrnehmung. Auch in Ländern, die die Einnahmen aus der Kohlendioxidsteuer umverteilt haben, waren Bürger*innen nicht ausreichend informiert worden, etwa  in der Schweiz, wo Bürger*innen Rabatte auf ihre Krankenversicherungsprämien erhalten haben.

Länder mit niedrigem und mittlerem Einkommen sind in ihren Umverteilungsoptionen aufgrund von Budgetbeschränkungen in Verbindung mit geringeren technischen und informatorischen Kapazitäten stärker eingeschränkt. So unterstützen z.B. Informationssysteme wie umfassende Melderegister die sozialen Sicherungssysteme. Ihre entscheidende Rolle bei der Bewältigung von Schocks durch gezielte Maßnahmen wurde während der COVID-19-Pandemie deutlich. So verwenden Länder mit niedrigem Einkommen aufgrund ihrer geringeren Kapazität zur Umsetzung gezielter Maßnahmen häufig universelle Subventionen anstelle von gezielteren Geldtransfers. Dies kann negative steuerliche und ökologische Folgen haben. Daher ist die Verbesserung der Informationssysteme für kurz- und langfristige Reformen wichtig. Insbesondere Länder mit niedrigem Einkommen benötigen Unterstützung, um ihre technischen Kapazitäten für den gerechten Übergang zu stärken, etwa, wenn sich der Preisanstieg, auch bei Kraftstoffen und Lebensmitteln, verschärft.

Politikgestaltung in der Energiekrise muss den gerechten Übergang im Blick haben. Andernfalls könnten die Länder die Gelegenheit verpassen, wie in vielen COVID-19-Konjunkturpaketen geschehen, die Klimaziele auf sozial gerechte Weise anzustreben. Angesichts ihres Potenzials, sind in vielen Ländern Reformen der Kohlenstoffbepreisung geplant, die für die Erreichung der Klimaziele und den Schutz und die Förderung gefährdeter Haushalte in den kommenden Jahren entscheidend sein werden.

Eine langfristige Perspektive für die aktuelle Energiekrise

Bonn, 17. Oktober 2022. Inmitten der sich zuspitzenden Krisen, wie dem Ukraine-Krieg, COVID-19 und dem Klimawandel, wird deutlich, wie schwierig es für Regierungen ist, kurzfristige mit langfristigen Prioritäten in Einklang zu bringen. Einerseits machen diese Krisen deutlich, dass ein Übergang zu einer nachhaltigen Wirtschaft und sozialer Gerechtigkeit notwendig ist. Das Konzept der „gerechten Übergänge“ hat an Zugkraft gewonnen, einschließlich der Debatten auf G7-Gipfeln und Klimakonferenzen über Partnerschaften für gerechte Energieübergänge und Klimaclubs. Andererseits scheinen die Prioritäten zur Energiesicherheit einer ehrgeizigen Klimapolitik entgegenzustehen, und die befürworteten Preissubventionen und -obergrenzen können die Verringerung des Verbrauchs fossiler Brennstoffe und der Energienachfrage insgesamt einschränken.

Reformen der Kohlenstoffbepreisung könnten die Kohärenz zwischen den derzeitigen Maßnahmen zur Bewältigung der Energiekrise und längerfristigen Ansätzen verbessern, also kurzfristige Maßnahmen mit dem gerechten Übergangsprozess verbinden. Eine Reform der Kohlenstoffbepreisung kombiniert zwei Komponenten: die Bepreisung von Kohlenstoffemissionen, einschließlich der Abschaffung von Subventionen für fossile Energieträger, die umweltschädlichem Verhalten entgegenwirken, sowie die Verwendung der erzielten Einnahmen. Eine vielversprechende Möglichkeit, die Einnahmen zu verwenden, sind Sozialprogramme, die die Menschen während des Übergangsprozesses vor höheren Preisen schützen. Derzeitige Maßnahmen zur Bewältigung der Energiekrise nutzen auch Transfers an Haushalte, um Preissteigerungen abzufedern. Aktuelle Untersuchungen zeigen, dass selbst bei den derzeitigen Energiepreiserhöhungen die Einführung von Kohlenstoffpreisen und die Umverteilung der Einnahmen an die Haushalte den Wohlstand im Vergleich zu einer Situation mit stabilisierten Preisen erhöhen würde. Gezielte Transfers würden bedürftigen Haushalten helfen und gleichzeitig Anreize zur Emissionsreduzierung bei den Reichsten schaffen, da die reichsten 10 % der Weltbevölkerung 50 % der globalen Emissionen ausstoßen. Transfers an Haushalte sind daher von entscheidender Bedeutung. Erkenntnisse zur Kohlenstoffpreisgestaltung bieten eine Orientierung, wie diese umgesetzt werden können.

Erstens sollten die Regierungen bei ihren Umverteilungsstrategien auf bestehende Armut und Ungleichheiten sowie auf politökonomische Hindernisse eingehen. Während der Energiekrise haben die Regierungen sowohl universelle Preismaßnahmen wie Obergrenzen und Subventionen für Gaspreise als auch Transfers an alle Bürger*innen oder gezieltere Unterstützung für die schwächsten Bevölkerungsschichten eingesetzt. Die Denkfabrik Bruegel stellt fest, dass alle europäischen Länder mit Ausnahme von Ungarn gezielte Unterstützung für gefährdete Gruppen bereitstellten. Wie Studien über die öffentliche Akzeptanz von Klimapolitik und Kohlenstoffpreisen verdeutlichen, beeinflusst die Wahrnehmung von Fairness den Erfolg und die Auswirkungen von Maßnahmen. Die Energiekrise zeigt jedoch, dass es für Regierungen schwierig ist, gefährdete Gruppen während großer Schocks zu identifizieren. Darüber hinaus müssen politisch-ökonomische Hindernisse überwunden werden, insbesondere, wenn auch wichtige Interessengruppen wie Energieversorger, der Privatsektor und Haushalte mit höherem Einkommen angesprochen werden sollen. Gezielte Transfers an ärmere Haushalte könnten steuerlichen Spielraum freisetzen, um diese anderen wichtigen Akteure zu unterstützen.

Zentral ist auch eine klare Kommunikation darüber, welche Ziele und beabsichtigten Wirkungen Sozialtransfers haben sollen. Die Bürger*innen müssen verstehen, welche Leistungen sie von der Regierung erhalten können und wie die Transfers die Verteilungsgerechtigkeit verbessern und sozial schwachen Haushalten zugutekommen. In der Vergangenheit stießen die Vorteile der Kohlendioxidsteuerreform auf mangelnde öffentliche Wahrnehmung. Auch in Ländern, die die Einnahmen aus der Kohlendioxidsteuer umverteilt haben, waren Bürger*innen nicht ausreichend informiert worden, etwa  in der Schweiz, wo Bürger*innen Rabatte auf ihre Krankenversicherungsprämien erhalten haben.

Länder mit niedrigem und mittlerem Einkommen sind in ihren Umverteilungsoptionen aufgrund von Budgetbeschränkungen in Verbindung mit geringeren technischen und informatorischen Kapazitäten stärker eingeschränkt. So unterstützen z.B. Informationssysteme wie umfassende Melderegister die sozialen Sicherungssysteme. Ihre entscheidende Rolle bei der Bewältigung von Schocks durch gezielte Maßnahmen wurde während der COVID-19-Pandemie deutlich. So verwenden Länder mit niedrigem Einkommen aufgrund ihrer geringeren Kapazität zur Umsetzung gezielter Maßnahmen häufig universelle Subventionen anstelle von gezielteren Geldtransfers. Dies kann negative steuerliche und ökologische Folgen haben. Daher ist die Verbesserung der Informationssysteme für kurz- und langfristige Reformen wichtig. Insbesondere Länder mit niedrigem Einkommen benötigen Unterstützung, um ihre technischen Kapazitäten für den gerechten Übergang zu stärken, etwa, wenn sich der Preisanstieg, auch bei Kraftstoffen und Lebensmitteln, verschärft.

Politikgestaltung in der Energiekrise muss den gerechten Übergang im Blick haben. Andernfalls könnten die Länder die Gelegenheit verpassen, wie in vielen COVID-19-Konjunkturpaketen geschehen, die Klimaziele auf sozial gerechte Weise anzustreben. Angesichts ihres Potenzials, sind in vielen Ländern Reformen der Kohlenstoffbepreisung geplant, die für die Erreichung der Klimaziele und den Schutz und die Förderung gefährdeter Haushalte in den kommenden Jahren entscheidend sein werden.

Pages