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Failing forward in the EU's common security and defense policy: the integration of EU crisis management

Recent years have witnessed renewed efforts to advance integration in the EU's Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP), including in the domain of military and civilian capability development. The adoption of a Civilian CSDP Compact (CCC) and the creation of a European Peace Facility (EPF) are prominent examples of recent steps taken towards further integration. Still, despite recent progress, CSDP reforms have often been slow to materialise, lag behind the reform ambitions of key EU foreign policy actors, and fail to address important shortcomings experienced by CSDP. This article addresses why this might be by exploring the evolution of CSDP crisis management through a failing forward approach, which charts the course of integration dynamics, identified by neofunctionalism and liberal intergovernmentalism, through time, revealing its cyclical nature. Our case studies of the EPF and the CCC demonstrate how the long-term integrative dynamics in EU military and civilian crisis management are marked by a cycle of crisis followed by incomplete institutional reforms, policy feedback, experiential learning and subsequent, yet again incomplete, efforts to remedy institutional shortcomings and policy failure.

Failing forward in the EU's common security and defense policy: the integration of EU crisis management

Recent years have witnessed renewed efforts to advance integration in the EU's Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP), including in the domain of military and civilian capability development. The adoption of a Civilian CSDP Compact (CCC) and the creation of a European Peace Facility (EPF) are prominent examples of recent steps taken towards further integration. Still, despite recent progress, CSDP reforms have often been slow to materialise, lag behind the reform ambitions of key EU foreign policy actors, and fail to address important shortcomings experienced by CSDP. This article addresses why this might be by exploring the evolution of CSDP crisis management through a failing forward approach, which charts the course of integration dynamics, identified by neofunctionalism and liberal intergovernmentalism, through time, revealing its cyclical nature. Our case studies of the EPF and the CCC demonstrate how the long-term integrative dynamics in EU military and civilian crisis management are marked by a cycle of crisis followed by incomplete institutional reforms, policy feedback, experiential learning and subsequent, yet again incomplete, efforts to remedy institutional shortcomings and policy failure.

Failing forward in the EU's common security and defense policy: the integration of EU crisis management

Recent years have witnessed renewed efforts to advance integration in the EU's Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP), including in the domain of military and civilian capability development. The adoption of a Civilian CSDP Compact (CCC) and the creation of a European Peace Facility (EPF) are prominent examples of recent steps taken towards further integration. Still, despite recent progress, CSDP reforms have often been slow to materialise, lag behind the reform ambitions of key EU foreign policy actors, and fail to address important shortcomings experienced by CSDP. This article addresses why this might be by exploring the evolution of CSDP crisis management through a failing forward approach, which charts the course of integration dynamics, identified by neofunctionalism and liberal intergovernmentalism, through time, revealing its cyclical nature. Our case studies of the EPF and the CCC demonstrate how the long-term integrative dynamics in EU military and civilian crisis management are marked by a cycle of crisis followed by incomplete institutional reforms, policy feedback, experiential learning and subsequent, yet again incomplete, efforts to remedy institutional shortcomings and policy failure.

A systematic review on ethical challenges of 'field' research in low-income and middle-income countries: respect, justice and beneficence for research staff?

Primary data collection in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) is associated with a range of ethical complexities. Considerations on how to adequately ensure the well-being of research staff are largely neglected in contemporary ethics discourse. This systematic review aims to identify the ethical challenges that research staff across different hierarchical levels and scientific disciplines face when conducting research in LMICs.

We searched 13 electronic databases and handsearched publications in six selected journals as well as the reference lists of all included studies. No restrictions were applied with respect to the publication date, research design, and target population.

23 151 studies were retrieved, 183 of which met our inclusion criteria. We identified nine different types of ethical challenges that research staff may be exposed to during field research, including (1) role conflicts that can emerge from participants’ help requests and the high level of deprivation found in certain study settings, (2) feelings of guilt and (3) detrimental mental health impacts. Further challenges were (4) sexual harassment (5) safety risks and (6) political repression, particularly in postconflict, disaster-ridden or autocratic study contexts. Additionally, studies reported (7) inadequate working conditions and (8) power imbalances within research teams, while (9) ethics boards were found to be ill equipped to anticipate and address emerging risks, thus increasing the ethical liability of researchers.

This review revealed several complex ethical challenges that research staff may face during data collection. In order to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal 8.8 on ‘safe and secure working environments’ and to protect research staff from harm, amendments must urgently be made to current ethical standards.

A systematic review on ethical challenges of 'field' research in low-income and middle-income countries: respect, justice and beneficence for research staff?

Primary data collection in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) is associated with a range of ethical complexities. Considerations on how to adequately ensure the well-being of research staff are largely neglected in contemporary ethics discourse. This systematic review aims to identify the ethical challenges that research staff across different hierarchical levels and scientific disciplines face when conducting research in LMICs.

We searched 13 electronic databases and handsearched publications in six selected journals as well as the reference lists of all included studies. No restrictions were applied with respect to the publication date, research design, and target population.

23 151 studies were retrieved, 183 of which met our inclusion criteria. We identified nine different types of ethical challenges that research staff may be exposed to during field research, including (1) role conflicts that can emerge from participants’ help requests and the high level of deprivation found in certain study settings, (2) feelings of guilt and (3) detrimental mental health impacts. Further challenges were (4) sexual harassment (5) safety risks and (6) political repression, particularly in postconflict, disaster-ridden or autocratic study contexts. Additionally, studies reported (7) inadequate working conditions and (8) power imbalances within research teams, while (9) ethics boards were found to be ill equipped to anticipate and address emerging risks, thus increasing the ethical liability of researchers.

This review revealed several complex ethical challenges that research staff may face during data collection. In order to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal 8.8 on ‘safe and secure working environments’ and to protect research staff from harm, amendments must urgently be made to current ethical standards.

A systematic review on ethical challenges of 'field' research in low-income and middle-income countries: respect, justice and beneficence for research staff?

Primary data collection in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) is associated with a range of ethical complexities. Considerations on how to adequately ensure the well-being of research staff are largely neglected in contemporary ethics discourse. This systematic review aims to identify the ethical challenges that research staff across different hierarchical levels and scientific disciplines face when conducting research in LMICs.

We searched 13 electronic databases and handsearched publications in six selected journals as well as the reference lists of all included studies. No restrictions were applied with respect to the publication date, research design, and target population.

23 151 studies were retrieved, 183 of which met our inclusion criteria. We identified nine different types of ethical challenges that research staff may be exposed to during field research, including (1) role conflicts that can emerge from participants’ help requests and the high level of deprivation found in certain study settings, (2) feelings of guilt and (3) detrimental mental health impacts. Further challenges were (4) sexual harassment (5) safety risks and (6) political repression, particularly in postconflict, disaster-ridden or autocratic study contexts. Additionally, studies reported (7) inadequate working conditions and (8) power imbalances within research teams, while (9) ethics boards were found to be ill equipped to anticipate and address emerging risks, thus increasing the ethical liability of researchers.

This review revealed several complex ethical challenges that research staff may face during data collection. In order to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal 8.8 on ‘safe and secure working environments’ and to protect research staff from harm, amendments must urgently be made to current ethical standards.

Buchbesprechung: "Schäfer, Armin, und Michael Zürn (2021): Die demokratische Regression. Die politischen Ursachen des autoritären Populismus"

Die Buchbesprechung rezensiert das Buch "Die demokratische Regression", in dem Armin Schäfer und Michael Zürn eine politische Erkärung für das Erstarken autoritär-populistischer Parteien und Politiker*innen entwickeln, die auf Defizite in der Funktionsweise der bestehenden Demokratien verweist.

Buchbesprechung: "Schäfer, Armin, und Michael Zürn (2021): Die demokratische Regression. Die politischen Ursachen des autoritären Populismus"

Die Buchbesprechung rezensiert das Buch "Die demokratische Regression", in dem Armin Schäfer und Michael Zürn eine politische Erkärung für das Erstarken autoritär-populistischer Parteien und Politiker*innen entwickeln, die auf Defizite in der Funktionsweise der bestehenden Demokratien verweist.

Buchbesprechung: "Schäfer, Armin, und Michael Zürn (2021): Die demokratische Regression. Die politischen Ursachen des autoritären Populismus"

Die Buchbesprechung rezensiert das Buch "Die demokratische Regression", in dem Armin Schäfer und Michael Zürn eine politische Erkärung für das Erstarken autoritär-populistischer Parteien und Politiker*innen entwickeln, die auf Defizite in der Funktionsweise der bestehenden Demokratien verweist.

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Das Deutsche Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung (DIW Berlin) sucht zum nächstmöglichen Zeitpunkt eine/n

 

VorstandsreferentIn (w/m/d)


Crise du Covid-19 et mobilité européenne : Quelles leçons ? Quel avenir ?

Fondation Robert Schuman / Publication - Mon, 19/07/2021 - 02:00
Qui aurait pu penser que la Commission européenne, un an et demi après le début de la pandémie, mettrait en place, avec un " certificat européen ", un sésame permettant de voyager sans difficultés au sein de l'Union européenne ? L'impact mondial de la crise sanitaire de Covid-19 a donné vie à ce sc...

A la une !, Le noir été des droits de l'Homme

Fondation Robert Schuman / Actualités - Mon, 19/07/2021 - 02:00
De la Biélorussie à la Chine, l'exercice des droits de l'Homme est de plus en plus difficile. Les droits de la personne humaine, valeur imprescriptible garantie par nos constitutions et les traités européens, méritent pourtant un engagement résolu de la part des Européens à travers le monde, souligne Jean-Dominique Giuliani.

Fondation, Le Rapport Schuman sur l'Europe, l'état de l'Union 2021

Fondation Robert Schuman / Actualités - Mon, 19/07/2021 - 02:00
L'édition 2021 du "Rapport Schuman sur l'Europe, l'état de l'Union", ouvrage de référence pour les décideurs européens, vient de paraître aux éditions Marie B. Les contributions des meilleurs experts et de hautes personnalités, comme Josep Borrell ou Margaritis Schinas, offrent un bilan des réalisations européennes et des nouvelles solidarités dans le contexte de la pandémie, ainsi qu'une large vue sur le rôle de l'Europe dans le monde. Il est disponible en version papier dans les librairies et sur notre site, et en version numérique en français et en anglais. Commandez le.

Fondation, L'Atlas permanent de l'Union européenne est disponible

Fondation Robert Schuman / Actualités - Mon, 19/07/2021 - 02:00
La nouvelle édition de 'l'Atlas permanent de l'Union européenne' a paru aux éditions Marie B. Cet ouvrage reflète les derniers changements politiques et économiques intervenus dans l'Union européenne et ses États membres. A travers plus de 50 cartes, des textes et des fiches thématiques, l'Atlas synthétise l'essentiel de l'histoire et des réalités politiques et statistiques de l'Union. Il est disponible, en version papier en français dans les librairies et sur notre site, et en version numérique en français et en anglais. Commandez le.

Fondation, Carte des mesures sanitaires et des conditions de voyage en Europe

Fondation Robert Schuman / Actualités - Mon, 19/07/2021 - 02:00
Face à l'augmentation des cas due au variant Delta, la Catalogne et la région de Valence, en Espagne, ont réintroduit des couvre-feu et limité les rassemblements à 10 personnes. En France, un certificat sanitaire sera demandé à partir du 21 juillet dans les lieux culturels et de loisirs, et à partir du 1er août dans les cafés, restaurants, centres commerciaux et hôpitaux, ainsi que pour voyager en avion et sur de longues distance en train et en car. Pour suivre l'évolution de la situation et connaître les conditions d'entrée dans les différents États membres de l'Union, la Fondation vous propose une carte complète des mesures en place. Une ressource indispensable, régulièrement actualisée.

Fondation, Biélorussie: chronologie d'une révolution en cours

Fondation Robert Schuman / Actualités - Mon, 19/07/2021 - 02:00
L'Union européenne et le Conseil de l'Europe ont condamné les perquisitions récentes contre des organisations de droits de l'Homme et des médias indépendants en Biélorussie. Ils ont de nouveau appelé à la libération de tous les prisonniers politiques. Pour suivre la crise ouverte depuis l'élection présidentielle truquée d'août 2020, la Fondation vous propose une chronologie des événements et les liens vers les réactions et initiatives européennes.

Commission, Paquet de mesures pour réduire les émissions de CO2 de 55%

Fondation Robert Schuman / Actualités - Mon, 19/07/2021 - 02:00
La Commission a présenté le 14 juillet plusieurs mesures afin d'atteindre l'objectif de réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre d'au moins 55% d'ici à 2030 par rapport à 1990. Elle propose notamment d'abaisser le plafond global d'émissions du système communautaire d'échange de quotas d'émission (SEQE), de supprimer les quotas gratuits pour l'aviation, et d'intégrer les émissions du transport maritime. Un second système d'échange sera créé pour le transport routier et les bâtiments. La Commission propose un mécanisme d'ajustement des émissions de carbone aux frontières qui fixera un prix du carbone pour les importations, ainsi que la fin des moteurs thermiques pour les voitures et camionnettes d'ici à 2035. La part des énergies renouvelables devra atteindre 40% d'ici à 2030, et la taxation sur l'énergie sera revue.

Commission, Nouvelle stratégie pour les forêts

Fondation Robert Schuman / Actualités - Mon, 19/07/2021 - 02:00
Le 16 juillet, la Commission a présenté la nouvelle stratégie de l'Union pour les forêts à l'horizon 2030, dans le cadre du pacte vert pour l'Europe. L'objectif est de promouvoir une nouvelle gestion forestière et de garantir la multifonctionnalité des forêts européennes. Les mesures proposées devraient notamment renforcer la séquestration du carbone grâce à l'amélioration des puits et des stocks.

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