You are here

Diplomacy & Defense Think Tank News

Mechanisms for governing the Water-Land-Food Nexus in the Lower Awash River Basin, Ethiopia: ensuring policy coherence in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda

Interdependencies among the goals and targets make the 2030 Agenda indivisible and their integrated implementation requires coherent policies. Coordination across different sectors and levels is deemed as crucial for avoiding trade-offs and achieving synergies among multiple, interlinked policy goals, which depend on natural resources. However, there is insufficient evidence regarding the conditions under which coordination for integrated achievement of different water- and land-based Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) functions effectively. The paper investigates the land and water governance in the Ethiopian lower Awash River basin and identifies key interdependencies among related SDGs. It assesses in how far the interactions and coordination among various decision-making centres are effective in managing the interdependencies among different goals. Systems for using and managing water and land exhibit features of polycentric governance as this process involves decision-making centres across different sectors and at various levels. Key action situations for land and water governance in operational, collective and constitutional choice levels are interlinked/networked. Each action situation constitutes actions that deliver one of the functions of polycentric governance, such as production, provision, monitoring etc. as an outcome, which affects the choices of actors in an adjacent action situation. The study shows that the existing institutions and governance mechanisms for water and land in Ethiopia are not effective in managing the interdependencies. Non-recognition of traditional communal rights of pastoralists over land and water and ineffective policy instruments for ensuring environmental and social safeguards are leading to major trade-offs among goals of local food security and economic growth. The autocratic regime of Ethiopia has coordination mechanisms in place, which fulfil the role of dissemination of policies and raising awareness. However, they are not designed to build consensus and political will for designing and implementing national plans, by including the interests and aspirations of the local communities and local governments. The study recommends efforts to achieve SDGs in the Ethiopian Awash River basin to focus on strengthening the capacities of relevant actors, especially the district and river basin authorities in delivering the key governance functions such as water infrastructure maintenance, efficient use of water, and effective implementation of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). Further, urgent efforts for scaling up of recognition, certification and protection of communal land rights of pastoralists and clear definition of rules for awarding compensation upon expropriation, are required.

Mechanisms for governing the Water-Land-Food Nexus in the Lower Awash River Basin, Ethiopia: ensuring policy coherence in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda

Interdependencies among the goals and targets make the 2030 Agenda indivisible and their integrated implementation requires coherent policies. Coordination across different sectors and levels is deemed as crucial for avoiding trade-offs and achieving synergies among multiple, interlinked policy goals, which depend on natural resources. However, there is insufficient evidence regarding the conditions under which coordination for integrated achievement of different water- and land-based Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) functions effectively. The paper investigates the land and water governance in the Ethiopian lower Awash River basin and identifies key interdependencies among related SDGs. It assesses in how far the interactions and coordination among various decision-making centres are effective in managing the interdependencies among different goals. Systems for using and managing water and land exhibit features of polycentric governance as this process involves decision-making centres across different sectors and at various levels. Key action situations for land and water governance in operational, collective and constitutional choice levels are interlinked/networked. Each action situation constitutes actions that deliver one of the functions of polycentric governance, such as production, provision, monitoring etc. as an outcome, which affects the choices of actors in an adjacent action situation. The study shows that the existing institutions and governance mechanisms for water and land in Ethiopia are not effective in managing the interdependencies. Non-recognition of traditional communal rights of pastoralists over land and water and ineffective policy instruments for ensuring environmental and social safeguards are leading to major trade-offs among goals of local food security and economic growth. The autocratic regime of Ethiopia has coordination mechanisms in place, which fulfil the role of dissemination of policies and raising awareness. However, they are not designed to build consensus and political will for designing and implementing national plans, by including the interests and aspirations of the local communities and local governments. The study recommends efforts to achieve SDGs in the Ethiopian Awash River basin to focus on strengthening the capacities of relevant actors, especially the district and river basin authorities in delivering the key governance functions such as water infrastructure maintenance, efficient use of water, and effective implementation of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). Further, urgent efforts for scaling up of recognition, certification and protection of communal land rights of pastoralists and clear definition of rules for awarding compensation upon expropriation, are required.

Mechanisms for governing the Water-Land-Food Nexus in the Lower Awash River Basin, Ethiopia: ensuring policy coherence in the implementation of the 2030 Agenda

Interdependencies among the goals and targets make the 2030 Agenda indivisible and their integrated implementation requires coherent policies. Coordination across different sectors and levels is deemed as crucial for avoiding trade-offs and achieving synergies among multiple, interlinked policy goals, which depend on natural resources. However, there is insufficient evidence regarding the conditions under which coordination for integrated achievement of different water- and land-based Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) functions effectively. The paper investigates the land and water governance in the Ethiopian lower Awash River basin and identifies key interdependencies among related SDGs. It assesses in how far the interactions and coordination among various decision-making centres are effective in managing the interdependencies among different goals. Systems for using and managing water and land exhibit features of polycentric governance as this process involves decision-making centres across different sectors and at various levels. Key action situations for land and water governance in operational, collective and constitutional choice levels are interlinked/networked. Each action situation constitutes actions that deliver one of the functions of polycentric governance, such as production, provision, monitoring etc. as an outcome, which affects the choices of actors in an adjacent action situation. The study shows that the existing institutions and governance mechanisms for water and land in Ethiopia are not effective in managing the interdependencies. Non-recognition of traditional communal rights of pastoralists over land and water and ineffective policy instruments for ensuring environmental and social safeguards are leading to major trade-offs among goals of local food security and economic growth. The autocratic regime of Ethiopia has coordination mechanisms in place, which fulfil the role of dissemination of policies and raising awareness. However, they are not designed to build consensus and political will for designing and implementing national plans, by including the interests and aspirations of the local communities and local governments. The study recommends efforts to achieve SDGs in the Ethiopian Awash River basin to focus on strengthening the capacities of relevant actors, especially the district and river basin authorities in delivering the key governance functions such as water infrastructure maintenance, efficient use of water, and effective implementation of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA). Further, urgent efforts for scaling up of recognition, certification and protection of communal land rights of pastoralists and clear definition of rules for awarding compensation upon expropriation, are required.

MitarbeiterIn Drittmittelverwaltung (w/m/div)

Die Serviceabteilung Finanzen vereint die Bereiche Rechnungswesen, Beschaffung, Drittmittel und Controlling und bietet interne Dienstleistungen für den Vorstand, die MitarbeiterInnen sowie die Gäste des Instituts an. Die Abteilung entwickelt innovative Instrumente zur Unterstützung der wissenschaftlichen Arbeit des DIW Berlin und setzt sie um. Dabei sorgt der Bereich Rechnungswesen für den reibungslosen Ablauf aller finanztechnischen Prozesse. Der Bereich Beschaffung kümmert sich um alle Beschaffungs- und Vergabevorgänge des Instituts. Der Drittmittelbereich betreut die Drittmittelprojekte von der Antragsphase bis zur Endabrechnung. Der Bereich Controlling verantwortet die Budgetplanung und das interne Berichtswesen, berät bei operativen Maßnahmen und bereitet strategische Entscheidungen vor. Die Abteilung verwaltete im Geschäftsjahr 2020 ein Budget von 33,8 Mio €, davon wurden 14,3 Mio € durch Drittmittelprojekte erwirtschaftet.

Die Serviceabteilung Finanzen sucht zum nächstmöglichen Zeitpunkt eine/n

MitarbeiterIn Drittmittelverwaltung (w/m/div)

(39 h/Woche), Teilzeit möglich

für die Abwicklung aller mit nationalen und internationalen Drittmittelprojekten verbundenen administrativen Aufgaben und Prozesse von der Antragsphase bis zur Abrechnung.


Marcel Fratzscher: „Bei der Regierungsbildung brauchen wir jetzt Tempo und Mut“

Die Wahl zum 20. Deutschen Bundestag kommentiert Marcel Fratzscher, Präsident des Deutschen Instituts für Wirtschaftsforschung (DIW Berlin), wie folgt:

Noch nie war die Bundesrepublik Deutschland politisch so vielfältig und so gespalten. Keine mögliche Regierungskoalition hat ein klares Mandat erhalten; jede Koalition muss sich erst Legitimität erarbeiten. Ich hoffe, dass sich die neuen Regierungsparteien nicht auf den kleinsten gemeinsamen Nenner einigen, sondern die Aufgaben klug und mutig untereinander aufteilen und die notwendige Entschlossenheit zur Veränderung haben. Deutschland steht vor den schwierigsten Herausforderung seit langer Zeit. Die neue Bundesregierung muss schnell wegweisende Entscheidungen zum Klimaschutz, zur digitalen Transformation und zur sozialen Erneuerung treffen. Wenn ihr dies nicht gelingt, wird Deutschlands wirtschaftlicher Wohlstand auf dem Spiel stehen und Europa Gefahr laufen im Systemwettbewerb mit China und den USA ins Hintertreffen zu geraten. Die neue Bundesregierung sollte sich daher schnell finden und in den ersten 100 Tagen ein überzeugendes Programm mit Schwerpunkt Zukunftsinvestitionen, Entbürokratisierung und einer stärkeren Integration Europas angehen. Wir brauchen endlich mehr Mut zur Veränderung. Dazu gehört, den mächtigen Interessensgruppen die Stirn zu bieten und die größte Hürde für Reformen – die Besitzstandswahrung in Deutschland – zu überwinden.

La estrategia de política comercial de la UE y sus implicaciones para España

Real Instituto Elcano - Thu, 23/09/2021 - 13:54
Enrique Feás. ARI 79/2021 - 23/9/2021

La nueva estrategia de política comercial de la UE, basada en el concepto de “autonomía estratégica abierta”, es un intento nada sencillo de usar esta potente herramienta de la UE como instrumento activo de defensa y promoción de sus intereses y valores estratégicos ante un mundo cada vez más complejo y multipolar.

Origins, evolution and future of global development cooperation: the role of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC)

Since its foundation in 1961, the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) – nerve centre of the aid effort of the “rich” countries – has played a central role in the PostWar aid system. This book traces the history of the institution and reflects on its future. How intense diplomacy led to the creation of the OECD itself and the DAC is disclosed here for the first time. How the DAC works, how it shaped development finance by defining and measuring Official Development Assistance (ODA), and how it has pursued its founding mission to increase the volume and effectiveness of aid, are key to the story.
The end of the Cold War brought on major aid fatigue. In response, the DAC proposed human development goals that eventually became the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It also prioritised policy frontiers such as gender equality, fragile states, sustainable development and policy coherence. More recently, the universal 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have succeeded the MDGs. China has become a leading source of development finance, population in SubSaharan Africa is set to double to 2 billion by 2050 out of a world total of 10 billion, and “global public bads” such as climate change and worldwide pandemics are putting not only development but our civilisation at risk. In this environment of unprecedented challenges and contested cooperation, the DAC seeks its place in the evolving global development architecture.

Origins, evolution and future of global development cooperation: the role of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC)

Since its foundation in 1961, the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) – nerve centre of the aid effort of the “rich” countries – has played a central role in the PostWar aid system. This book traces the history of the institution and reflects on its future. How intense diplomacy led to the creation of the OECD itself and the DAC is disclosed here for the first time. How the DAC works, how it shaped development finance by defining and measuring Official Development Assistance (ODA), and how it has pursued its founding mission to increase the volume and effectiveness of aid, are key to the story.
The end of the Cold War brought on major aid fatigue. In response, the DAC proposed human development goals that eventually became the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It also prioritised policy frontiers such as gender equality, fragile states, sustainable development and policy coherence. More recently, the universal 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have succeeded the MDGs. China has become a leading source of development finance, population in SubSaharan Africa is set to double to 2 billion by 2050 out of a world total of 10 billion, and “global public bads” such as climate change and worldwide pandemics are putting not only development but our civilisation at risk. In this environment of unprecedented challenges and contested cooperation, the DAC seeks its place in the evolving global development architecture.

Origins, evolution and future of global development cooperation: the role of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC)

Since its foundation in 1961, the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) – nerve centre of the aid effort of the “rich” countries – has played a central role in the PostWar aid system. This book traces the history of the institution and reflects on its future. How intense diplomacy led to the creation of the OECD itself and the DAC is disclosed here for the first time. How the DAC works, how it shaped development finance by defining and measuring Official Development Assistance (ODA), and how it has pursued its founding mission to increase the volume and effectiveness of aid, are key to the story.
The end of the Cold War brought on major aid fatigue. In response, the DAC proposed human development goals that eventually became the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It also prioritised policy frontiers such as gender equality, fragile states, sustainable development and policy coherence. More recently, the universal 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have succeeded the MDGs. China has become a leading source of development finance, population in SubSaharan Africa is set to double to 2 billion by 2050 out of a world total of 10 billion, and “global public bads” such as climate change and worldwide pandemics are putting not only development but our civilisation at risk. In this environment of unprecedented challenges and contested cooperation, the DAC seeks its place in the evolving global development architecture.

Warum die deutsche Wasserstoffstrategie eine multilaterale Ergänzung braucht

Im Juni 2020 hat das Kabinett die Nationale Wasserstoffstrategie (NWS) verabschiedet. Die künftige Bundesregierung sollte diese weiterentwickeln und implementieren. Denn mit ihr sind ambitionierte Ziele im Rahmen der Energiewende verbunden. Wasserstoff (H2) kann als Energieträger dort eingesetzt werden, wo die elektrische Energieversorgung aus techno-ökonomischen Gründen nicht möglich ist, etwa im Schwerlastverkehr oder in der Seefahrt. Gleichzeitig ist H2 ein flexibel einsetzbarer Rohstoff für industrielle Prozesse, vor allem in der chemischen Industrie und bei der Stahlherstellung. Bereits heute werden 55 Terrawattstunden (TWh) H2 in industrielle Prozesse in Deutschland eingespeist, das ist mehr als das Vierfache des Stromverbrauchs von Berlin (12,8 TWh in 2020). H2 ist weder als Energieträger noch als industrieller Rohstoff neu. Allerdings wird bislang fast ausschließlich „grauer H2“ eingesetzt, der durch die Umwandlung fossiler Energieträger (v.a. Erdgas) gewonnen wird, wobei erhebliche Mengen an CO2 freigesetzt werden. Um den nationalen Klimazielen näherzukommen, setzt die NWS ganz auf „grünen“ H2. Dieser basiert auf Strom aus erneuerbaren Energiequellen (v.a. Solar-Photovoltaik und Wind).

Die NWS verbindet Klima- und Industriepolitik. Erklärtes Ziel ist es, Deutschland zum Vorreiter und Weltmarktführer bei Wasserstofftechnologien zu machen. Die Vision eines raschen Markthochlaufs für grünen H2 zur Dekarbonisierung von Industrie und Verkehr ist mit quantitativen Herausforderungen verbunden. Die Bundesregierung erwartet bereits 2030 einen Bedarf für grünen H2 von 90-110 TWh. Bis dahin sollen in Deutschland Erzeugungskapazitäten von 5 Gigawatt (GW) auf Basis von erneuerbaren Energien aufgebaut werden. Zum Vergleich: Im Juli 2021 wurde in Wesseling bei Köln einer der nach Angaben der Betreiberfirma Shell weltgrößten Elektrolyseure zur Erzeugung von H2 mit einer Kapazität von 10 Megawatt (MW) in Betrieb genommen. 500 derartige Anlagen wären rechnerisch notwendig, um die Kapazitätsziele für 2030 zu erreichen. Dies ist eine techno-ökonomische Herausforderung, weil Elektrolyseure nach wie vor nicht standardisiert sind und bislang nicht kostengünstig in Serie gefertigt werden.

Die NWS rechnet mit 14 TWh an grünem H2, der mit den bis 2030 voraussichtlich zur Verfügung stehenden Kapazitäten gewonnen werden kann; dies entspricht jedoch nur etwa 13% bis 16 % des erwarteten Bedarfs. Auch nach der Abkehr von fossilen Energiequellen wird Deutschland daher Nettoimporteur von Energie bleiben, vor allem wenn es um die Gewinnung von Antriebsstoffen und industrieller Prozesswärme geht. Bei der Frage, woher die angepeilten hohen Mengen an grünem H2 importiert werden sollen, bleibt die NWS recht vage. Angeführt wird eine Zusammenarbeit mit Nordeuropa (Offshore Wind) und mit Südeuropa (Photovoltaik und Wind). Die Kooperation mit Ländern des Globalen Südens wird in der NWS ebenfalls erwähnt, ohne jedoch auf die möglichen Interessenlagen, Chancen und Risiken einzugehen. In den letzten Jahren hat Deutschland Energiepartnerschaften mit einer Reihe von Entwicklungs- und Schwellenländern begonnen, unter anderen mit Algerien, Marokko, Chile und jüngst Namibia. Weitgehend offen ist die Frage, unter welchen Bedingungen diese Länder bereit sein werden, ihre Potenziale an erneuerbaren Energien zu nutzen, um auf großer Skala grünen H2 für den deutschen und europäischen Markt bereitzustellen.

Die NWS muss daher um eine europäische und eine multilaterale Agenda ergänzt werden, die grünen H2 als Chance zur Bewältigung globaler Herausforderungen begreift und auf vielseitigen Nutzen setzt. Beispielsweise sind die Länder Nordafrikas zwingend darauf angewiesen, Beschäftigungschancen gerade für junge Menschen zu schaffen. Internationale Projekte, wie das von Deutschland unterstützte Ouarzazate-Solarprojekt in Marokko, zeigen aber, dass die Beschäftigungsmöglichkeiten oft bescheiden sind, sobald Großanlagen die Bauphase abgeschlossen haben und in den Regelbetrieb gehen. Deutschland und Europa sollten in einem partnerschaftlichen Ansatz auf mögliche Exportländer zugehen und ausloten, welche Co-Benefits erzielt werden können, um den politischen Willen und die lokale Akzeptanz zur Einbindung in eine internationale Wasserstoffökonomie zu erhöhen. Wissenstransfer und Wissenschaftskooperation sind essentiell, um auch Entwicklungsländer zu befähigen, H2-basierte Lösungen zu entwickeln. Beispiele hierfür sind die Umstellung der Düngemittelproduktion von fossilen Rohstoffen auf H2 oder die Dekarbonisierung der (petro-) chemischen Industrie. Technologisch weiter fortgeschrittene Länder wie Südafrika oder Brasilien könnten Kernkomponenten für Elektrolyseure liefern. In den am wenigsten entwickelten Ländern kann H2 als Energiespeicher in Stromnetzen genutzt werden, die von intermittierenden erneuerbaren Energiequellen gespeist werden.

Vieles spricht dafür, in einem ersten Schritt systematischer als bislang geschehen die NWS und die europäische H2-Strategie zu verschränken. Dies würde die Kraft der europäischen Stimme im internationalen Konzert stärken. Denn für viele Entwicklungsländer steht mit China ein weiterer durchaus interessanter Partner für eine internationale Wasserstoffkooperation bereit.

Dieser Text ist im Rahmen der Reihe „Impulse zur Bundestagswahl“ erschienen.

Warum die deutsche Wasserstoffstrategie eine multilaterale Ergänzung braucht

Im Juni 2020 hat das Kabinett die Nationale Wasserstoffstrategie (NWS) verabschiedet. Die künftige Bundesregierung sollte diese weiterentwickeln und implementieren. Denn mit ihr sind ambitionierte Ziele im Rahmen der Energiewende verbunden. Wasserstoff (H2) kann als Energieträger dort eingesetzt werden, wo die elektrische Energieversorgung aus techno-ökonomischen Gründen nicht möglich ist, etwa im Schwerlastverkehr oder in der Seefahrt. Gleichzeitig ist H2 ein flexibel einsetzbarer Rohstoff für industrielle Prozesse, vor allem in der chemischen Industrie und bei der Stahlherstellung. Bereits heute werden 55 Terrawattstunden (TWh) H2 in industrielle Prozesse in Deutschland eingespeist, das ist mehr als das Vierfache des Stromverbrauchs von Berlin (12,8 TWh in 2020). H2 ist weder als Energieträger noch als industrieller Rohstoff neu. Allerdings wird bislang fast ausschließlich „grauer H2“ eingesetzt, der durch die Umwandlung fossiler Energieträger (v.a. Erdgas) gewonnen wird, wobei erhebliche Mengen an CO2 freigesetzt werden. Um den nationalen Klimazielen näherzukommen, setzt die NWS ganz auf „grünen“ H2. Dieser basiert auf Strom aus erneuerbaren Energiequellen (v.a. Solar-Photovoltaik und Wind).

Die NWS verbindet Klima- und Industriepolitik. Erklärtes Ziel ist es, Deutschland zum Vorreiter und Weltmarktführer bei Wasserstofftechnologien zu machen. Die Vision eines raschen Markthochlaufs für grünen H2 zur Dekarbonisierung von Industrie und Verkehr ist mit quantitativen Herausforderungen verbunden. Die Bundesregierung erwartet bereits 2030 einen Bedarf für grünen H2 von 90-110 TWh. Bis dahin sollen in Deutschland Erzeugungskapazitäten von 5 Gigawatt (GW) auf Basis von erneuerbaren Energien aufgebaut werden. Zum Vergleich: Im Juli 2021 wurde in Wesseling bei Köln einer der nach Angaben der Betreiberfirma Shell weltgrößten Elektrolyseure zur Erzeugung von H2 mit einer Kapazität von 10 Megawatt (MW) in Betrieb genommen. 500 derartige Anlagen wären rechnerisch notwendig, um die Kapazitätsziele für 2030 zu erreichen. Dies ist eine techno-ökonomische Herausforderung, weil Elektrolyseure nach wie vor nicht standardisiert sind und bislang nicht kostengünstig in Serie gefertigt werden.

Die NWS rechnet mit 14 TWh an grünem H2, der mit den bis 2030 voraussichtlich zur Verfügung stehenden Kapazitäten gewonnen werden kann; dies entspricht jedoch nur etwa 13% bis 16 % des erwarteten Bedarfs. Auch nach der Abkehr von fossilen Energiequellen wird Deutschland daher Nettoimporteur von Energie bleiben, vor allem wenn es um die Gewinnung von Antriebsstoffen und industrieller Prozesswärme geht. Bei der Frage, woher die angepeilten hohen Mengen an grünem H2 importiert werden sollen, bleibt die NWS recht vage. Angeführt wird eine Zusammenarbeit mit Nordeuropa (Offshore Wind) und mit Südeuropa (Photovoltaik und Wind). Die Kooperation mit Ländern des Globalen Südens wird in der NWS ebenfalls erwähnt, ohne jedoch auf die möglichen Interessenlagen, Chancen und Risiken einzugehen. In den letzten Jahren hat Deutschland Energiepartnerschaften mit einer Reihe von Entwicklungs- und Schwellenländern begonnen, unter anderen mit Algerien, Marokko, Chile und jüngst Namibia. Weitgehend offen ist die Frage, unter welchen Bedingungen diese Länder bereit sein werden, ihre Potenziale an erneuerbaren Energien zu nutzen, um auf großer Skala grünen H2 für den deutschen und europäischen Markt bereitzustellen.

Die NWS muss daher um eine europäische und eine multilaterale Agenda ergänzt werden, die grünen H2 als Chance zur Bewältigung globaler Herausforderungen begreift und auf vielseitigen Nutzen setzt. Beispielsweise sind die Länder Nordafrikas zwingend darauf angewiesen, Beschäftigungschancen gerade für junge Menschen zu schaffen. Internationale Projekte, wie das von Deutschland unterstützte Ouarzazate-Solarprojekt in Marokko, zeigen aber, dass die Beschäftigungsmöglichkeiten oft bescheiden sind, sobald Großanlagen die Bauphase abgeschlossen haben und in den Regelbetrieb gehen. Deutschland und Europa sollten in einem partnerschaftlichen Ansatz auf mögliche Exportländer zugehen und ausloten, welche Co-Benefits erzielt werden können, um den politischen Willen und die lokale Akzeptanz zur Einbindung in eine internationale Wasserstoffökonomie zu erhöhen. Wissenstransfer und Wissenschaftskooperation sind essentiell, um auch Entwicklungsländer zu befähigen, H2-basierte Lösungen zu entwickeln. Beispiele hierfür sind die Umstellung der Düngemittelproduktion von fossilen Rohstoffen auf H2 oder die Dekarbonisierung der (petro-) chemischen Industrie. Technologisch weiter fortgeschrittene Länder wie Südafrika oder Brasilien könnten Kernkomponenten für Elektrolyseure liefern. In den am wenigsten entwickelten Ländern kann H2 als Energiespeicher in Stromnetzen genutzt werden, die von intermittierenden erneuerbaren Energiequellen gespeist werden.

Vieles spricht dafür, in einem ersten Schritt systematischer als bislang geschehen die NWS und die europäische H2-Strategie zu verschränken. Dies würde die Kraft der europäischen Stimme im internationalen Konzert stärken. Denn für viele Entwicklungsländer steht mit China ein weiterer durchaus interessanter Partner für eine internationale Wasserstoffkooperation bereit.

Dieser Text ist im Rahmen der Reihe „Impulse zur Bundestagswahl“ erschienen.

Warum die deutsche Wasserstoffstrategie eine multilaterale Ergänzung braucht

Im Juni 2020 hat das Kabinett die Nationale Wasserstoffstrategie (NWS) verabschiedet. Die künftige Bundesregierung sollte diese weiterentwickeln und implementieren. Denn mit ihr sind ambitionierte Ziele im Rahmen der Energiewende verbunden. Wasserstoff (H2) kann als Energieträger dort eingesetzt werden, wo die elektrische Energieversorgung aus techno-ökonomischen Gründen nicht möglich ist, etwa im Schwerlastverkehr oder in der Seefahrt. Gleichzeitig ist H2 ein flexibel einsetzbarer Rohstoff für industrielle Prozesse, vor allem in der chemischen Industrie und bei der Stahlherstellung. Bereits heute werden 55 Terrawattstunden (TWh) H2 in industrielle Prozesse in Deutschland eingespeist, das ist mehr als das Vierfache des Stromverbrauchs von Berlin (12,8 TWh in 2020). H2 ist weder als Energieträger noch als industrieller Rohstoff neu. Allerdings wird bislang fast ausschließlich „grauer H2“ eingesetzt, der durch die Umwandlung fossiler Energieträger (v.a. Erdgas) gewonnen wird, wobei erhebliche Mengen an CO2 freigesetzt werden. Um den nationalen Klimazielen näherzukommen, setzt die NWS ganz auf „grünen“ H2. Dieser basiert auf Strom aus erneuerbaren Energiequellen (v.a. Solar-Photovoltaik und Wind).

Die NWS verbindet Klima- und Industriepolitik. Erklärtes Ziel ist es, Deutschland zum Vorreiter und Weltmarktführer bei Wasserstofftechnologien zu machen. Die Vision eines raschen Markthochlaufs für grünen H2 zur Dekarbonisierung von Industrie und Verkehr ist mit quantitativen Herausforderungen verbunden. Die Bundesregierung erwartet bereits 2030 einen Bedarf für grünen H2 von 90-110 TWh. Bis dahin sollen in Deutschland Erzeugungskapazitäten von 5 Gigawatt (GW) auf Basis von erneuerbaren Energien aufgebaut werden. Zum Vergleich: Im Juli 2021 wurde in Wesseling bei Köln einer der nach Angaben der Betreiberfirma Shell weltgrößten Elektrolyseure zur Erzeugung von H2 mit einer Kapazität von 10 Megawatt (MW) in Betrieb genommen. 500 derartige Anlagen wären rechnerisch notwendig, um die Kapazitätsziele für 2030 zu erreichen. Dies ist eine techno-ökonomische Herausforderung, weil Elektrolyseure nach wie vor nicht standardisiert sind und bislang nicht kostengünstig in Serie gefertigt werden.

Die NWS rechnet mit 14 TWh an grünem H2, der mit den bis 2030 voraussichtlich zur Verfügung stehenden Kapazitäten gewonnen werden kann; dies entspricht jedoch nur etwa 13% bis 16 % des erwarteten Bedarfs. Auch nach der Abkehr von fossilen Energiequellen wird Deutschland daher Nettoimporteur von Energie bleiben, vor allem wenn es um die Gewinnung von Antriebsstoffen und industrieller Prozesswärme geht. Bei der Frage, woher die angepeilten hohen Mengen an grünem H2 importiert werden sollen, bleibt die NWS recht vage. Angeführt wird eine Zusammenarbeit mit Nordeuropa (Offshore Wind) und mit Südeuropa (Photovoltaik und Wind). Die Kooperation mit Ländern des Globalen Südens wird in der NWS ebenfalls erwähnt, ohne jedoch auf die möglichen Interessenlagen, Chancen und Risiken einzugehen. In den letzten Jahren hat Deutschland Energiepartnerschaften mit einer Reihe von Entwicklungs- und Schwellenländern begonnen, unter anderen mit Algerien, Marokko, Chile und jüngst Namibia. Weitgehend offen ist die Frage, unter welchen Bedingungen diese Länder bereit sein werden, ihre Potenziale an erneuerbaren Energien zu nutzen, um auf großer Skala grünen H2 für den deutschen und europäischen Markt bereitzustellen.

Die NWS muss daher um eine europäische und eine multilaterale Agenda ergänzt werden, die grünen H2 als Chance zur Bewältigung globaler Herausforderungen begreift und auf vielseitigen Nutzen setzt. Beispielsweise sind die Länder Nordafrikas zwingend darauf angewiesen, Beschäftigungschancen gerade für junge Menschen zu schaffen. Internationale Projekte, wie das von Deutschland unterstützte Ouarzazate-Solarprojekt in Marokko, zeigen aber, dass die Beschäftigungsmöglichkeiten oft bescheiden sind, sobald Großanlagen die Bauphase abgeschlossen haben und in den Regelbetrieb gehen. Deutschland und Europa sollten in einem partnerschaftlichen Ansatz auf mögliche Exportländer zugehen und ausloten, welche Co-Benefits erzielt werden können, um den politischen Willen und die lokale Akzeptanz zur Einbindung in eine internationale Wasserstoffökonomie zu erhöhen. Wissenstransfer und Wissenschaftskooperation sind essentiell, um auch Entwicklungsländer zu befähigen, H2-basierte Lösungen zu entwickeln. Beispiele hierfür sind die Umstellung der Düngemittelproduktion von fossilen Rohstoffen auf H2 oder die Dekarbonisierung der (petro-) chemischen Industrie. Technologisch weiter fortgeschrittene Länder wie Südafrika oder Brasilien könnten Kernkomponenten für Elektrolyseure liefern. In den am wenigsten entwickelten Ländern kann H2 als Energiespeicher in Stromnetzen genutzt werden, die von intermittierenden erneuerbaren Energiequellen gespeist werden.

Vieles spricht dafür, in einem ersten Schritt systematischer als bislang geschehen die NWS und die europäische H2-Strategie zu verschränken. Dies würde die Kraft der europäischen Stimme im internationalen Konzert stärken. Denn für viele Entwicklungsländer steht mit China ein weiterer durchaus interessanter Partner für eine internationale Wasserstoffkooperation bereit.

Dieser Text ist im Rahmen der Reihe „Impulse zur Bundestagswahl“ erschienen.

Refugees and local power dynamics: the case of Gambella Region of Ethiopia

The Gambella Region is one of the marginalised and most conflict-ridden regions in Ethiopia. Recently, violent clashes between the two largest ethnic groups in the region - the host communities, the Anywaa, and the South Sudanese Nuer refugees - have reignited the debate on refugee integration in the region. In fact, the roots of the Anywaa-Nuer conflict can be traced back to the imperial regime of Ethiopia at the end of the 19th century. In the early 1960s however, the arrival and spontaneous integration of Nuer refugees was peaceful and relations between both ethnic groups were harmonious. During this time, refugee management was organised locally. Against this background, the focus of the present paper is to understand the nature, context and evolution of the long-standing conflict between the Anywaa and refugees from the Nuer ethnic group in the Gambella Region. Beyond that, the paper explores the Anywaa-Nuer conflict within the context of the political power dynamics of the last two decades. Thereby, the paper reveals that the disputes between the Anywaa and the Nuer have taken on a new dimension since the early 1990s.

Refugees and local power dynamics: the case of Gambella Region of Ethiopia

The Gambella Region is one of the marginalised and most conflict-ridden regions in Ethiopia. Recently, violent clashes between the two largest ethnic groups in the region - the host communities, the Anywaa, and the South Sudanese Nuer refugees - have reignited the debate on refugee integration in the region. In fact, the roots of the Anywaa-Nuer conflict can be traced back to the imperial regime of Ethiopia at the end of the 19th century. In the early 1960s however, the arrival and spontaneous integration of Nuer refugees was peaceful and relations between both ethnic groups were harmonious. During this time, refugee management was organised locally. Against this background, the focus of the present paper is to understand the nature, context and evolution of the long-standing conflict between the Anywaa and refugees from the Nuer ethnic group in the Gambella Region. Beyond that, the paper explores the Anywaa-Nuer conflict within the context of the political power dynamics of the last two decades. Thereby, the paper reveals that the disputes between the Anywaa and the Nuer have taken on a new dimension since the early 1990s.

Refugees and local power dynamics: the case of Gambella Region of Ethiopia

The Gambella Region is one of the marginalised and most conflict-ridden regions in Ethiopia. Recently, violent clashes between the two largest ethnic groups in the region - the host communities, the Anywaa, and the South Sudanese Nuer refugees - have reignited the debate on refugee integration in the region. In fact, the roots of the Anywaa-Nuer conflict can be traced back to the imperial regime of Ethiopia at the end of the 19th century. In the early 1960s however, the arrival and spontaneous integration of Nuer refugees was peaceful and relations between both ethnic groups were harmonious. During this time, refugee management was organised locally. Against this background, the focus of the present paper is to understand the nature, context and evolution of the long-standing conflict between the Anywaa and refugees from the Nuer ethnic group in the Gambella Region. Beyond that, the paper explores the Anywaa-Nuer conflict within the context of the political power dynamics of the last two decades. Thereby, the paper reveals that the disputes between the Anywaa and the Nuer have taken on a new dimension since the early 1990s.

Europa sollte die Zusammenarbeit mit dem Nahen Osten und Nordafrika stärker auf die Gesellschaftsverträge fokussieren

2021 ist ein wichtiges Jahr für die Zusammenarbeit Europas mit seinen Nachbarn im Nahen Osten und in Nordafrika (MENA). Die Corona-Pandemie zwang die Europäische Union (EU) bei der Erstellung ihres neuen Mehrjahreshaushalts, die politischen, wirtschaftlichen und sozialen Prioritäten ihrer Kooperation mit den MENA-Ländern sowie die ihrer Mitgliedstaaten zu überdenken. Ihr Potenzial, die Beziehungen zwischen Staat und Gesellschaft in den MENA-Ländern positiv zu beeinflussen, hat sie aber noch längst nicht ausgeschöpft. Die jüngste Mitteilung zur Europäischen Nachbarschaftspolitik (ENP) Süd vom Februar 2021 kündigt eine „neue Agenda“ für die Zusammenarbeit mit den MENA-Ländern an. Offensichtliche Zielkonflikte bleiben aber unausgesprochen, v.a. die Unvereinbarkeit des Strebens nach liberal-demokratischen und Wirtschaftsreformen, mehr Rechenschaftspflicht und der Achtung von Menschenrechten durch die MENA-Regierungen auf der einen Seite und einer restriktiven Handelspolitik der EU, Migrationssteuerung und sicherheitspolitischer Kooperation auf der anderen. Zudem mangelt es an bilateraler Koordination zwischen den EU-Mitgliedstaaten. Das Konzept des Gesellschaftsvertrags könnte helfen, diese Konflikte zu überwinden. Sie sind unvermeidlich, wenn inter-nationale Kooperation v.a. kurz- bis mittelfristige Ziele wie Migrationssteuerung, Resilienzförderung und Privatinvestitionen verfolgt. In autoritären Kontexten wird dadurch aber oft der Staat zu Lasten der Gesellschaft gestärkt, was zu Spannungen führt und nicht zur angestrebten Stabilität. Gesellschaftsverträge stärker zu beachten führt zu einer längerfristigen Perspektive. Sie beruhen auf der Erbringung von 3 „P“s durch den Staat: Protection (Schutz der Bürger), Provision (wirtschaftliche und soziale Dienstleistungen) und Participation (Teilhabe der Gesellschaft an Entscheidungen).
Das Konzept des Gesellschaftsvertrags kann Orientierung bei der gemeinsamen Ausrichtung und Organisation der Politik der EU und ihrer Mitgliedstaaten geben. Es verdeutlicht, wie die drei „P“s bei der Verbesserung des sozialen Zusammenhalts, der innerstaatlichen Beziehungen und der politischen Stabilität zusammenwirken. Dadurch hilft es, die Wirksamkeit, Kohärenz und Koordination der MENA-Politik der EU und ihrer Mitgliedstaaten zu verbessern. Einige Mitglieder fokussieren hierin auf Handel und Investitionen, andere auf politische Reformen und Menschenrechte und wieder andere auf Migrationssteuerung. Eine längerfristige Perspektive würde verdeutlichen, dass nachhaltigere Gesellschaftsverträge in den MENA-Ländern alle diesen Zielen dienlich sind. Alle Maßnahmen der Europäer sollten daher auf Reformen abzielen, die die Gesellschaftsverträge der MENA-Länder für alle Vertragsparteien, also Regierungen und gesellschaftliche Gruppen, akzeptabler machen. Im Idealfall werden solche Reformen von den Parteien auf Augenhöhe ausgehandelt. In der Praxis ist die Verhandlungsmacht der Gesellschaft aber oft begrenzt – weshalb europäische Politik die Gesellschaften stets mindestens so sehr stärken sollte wie die Regierungen. In diesem Papier werden vier Bereiche der Zusammenarbeit erörtert, die wirkungsvolle Treiber für Veränderungen in den Gesellschaftsverträgen darstellen: (i) Konfliktlösung, Friedenskonsolidierung und Wiederaufbau; (ii) Wiederaufbau nach der Corona-Pandemie: Gesundheit und soziale Absicherung; (iii) Partizipation auf lokaler, regionaler und nationaler Ebene; sowie (iv) Migration und Mobilität zum gegenseitigen Nutzen.

Europa sollte die Zusammenarbeit mit dem Nahen Osten und Nordafrika stärker auf die Gesellschaftsverträge fokussieren

2021 ist ein wichtiges Jahr für die Zusammenarbeit Europas mit seinen Nachbarn im Nahen Osten und in Nordafrika (MENA). Die Corona-Pandemie zwang die Europäische Union (EU) bei der Erstellung ihres neuen Mehrjahreshaushalts, die politischen, wirtschaftlichen und sozialen Prioritäten ihrer Kooperation mit den MENA-Ländern sowie die ihrer Mitgliedstaaten zu überdenken. Ihr Potenzial, die Beziehungen zwischen Staat und Gesellschaft in den MENA-Ländern positiv zu beeinflussen, hat sie aber noch längst nicht ausgeschöpft. Die jüngste Mitteilung zur Europäischen Nachbarschaftspolitik (ENP) Süd vom Februar 2021 kündigt eine „neue Agenda“ für die Zusammenarbeit mit den MENA-Ländern an. Offensichtliche Zielkonflikte bleiben aber unausgesprochen, v.a. die Unvereinbarkeit des Strebens nach liberal-demokratischen und Wirtschaftsreformen, mehr Rechenschaftspflicht und der Achtung von Menschenrechten durch die MENA-Regierungen auf der einen Seite und einer restriktiven Handelspolitik der EU, Migrationssteuerung und sicherheitspolitischer Kooperation auf der anderen. Zudem mangelt es an bilateraler Koordination zwischen den EU-Mitgliedstaaten. Das Konzept des Gesellschaftsvertrags könnte helfen, diese Konflikte zu überwinden. Sie sind unvermeidlich, wenn inter-nationale Kooperation v.a. kurz- bis mittelfristige Ziele wie Migrationssteuerung, Resilienzförderung und Privatinvestitionen verfolgt. In autoritären Kontexten wird dadurch aber oft der Staat zu Lasten der Gesellschaft gestärkt, was zu Spannungen führt und nicht zur angestrebten Stabilität. Gesellschaftsverträge stärker zu beachten führt zu einer längerfristigen Perspektive. Sie beruhen auf der Erbringung von 3 „P“s durch den Staat: Protection (Schutz der Bürger), Provision (wirtschaftliche und soziale Dienstleistungen) und Participation (Teilhabe der Gesellschaft an Entscheidungen).
Das Konzept des Gesellschaftsvertrags kann Orientierung bei der gemeinsamen Ausrichtung und Organisation der Politik der EU und ihrer Mitgliedstaaten geben. Es verdeutlicht, wie die drei „P“s bei der Verbesserung des sozialen Zusammenhalts, der innerstaatlichen Beziehungen und der politischen Stabilität zusammenwirken. Dadurch hilft es, die Wirksamkeit, Kohärenz und Koordination der MENA-Politik der EU und ihrer Mitgliedstaaten zu verbessern. Einige Mitglieder fokussieren hierin auf Handel und Investitionen, andere auf politische Reformen und Menschenrechte und wieder andere auf Migrationssteuerung. Eine längerfristige Perspektive würde verdeutlichen, dass nachhaltigere Gesellschaftsverträge in den MENA-Ländern alle diesen Zielen dienlich sind. Alle Maßnahmen der Europäer sollten daher auf Reformen abzielen, die die Gesellschaftsverträge der MENA-Länder für alle Vertragsparteien, also Regierungen und gesellschaftliche Gruppen, akzeptabler machen. Im Idealfall werden solche Reformen von den Parteien auf Augenhöhe ausgehandelt. In der Praxis ist die Verhandlungsmacht der Gesellschaft aber oft begrenzt – weshalb europäische Politik die Gesellschaften stets mindestens so sehr stärken sollte wie die Regierungen. In diesem Papier werden vier Bereiche der Zusammenarbeit erörtert, die wirkungsvolle Treiber für Veränderungen in den Gesellschaftsverträgen darstellen: (i) Konfliktlösung, Friedenskonsolidierung und Wiederaufbau; (ii) Wiederaufbau nach der Corona-Pandemie: Gesundheit und soziale Absicherung; (iii) Partizipation auf lokaler, regionaler und nationaler Ebene; sowie (iv) Migration und Mobilität zum gegenseitigen Nutzen.

Pages