You are here

Diplomacy & Defense Think Tank News

Dissecting aid fragmentation: development goals and levels of analysis

Aid fragmentation is widely denounced, though recent studies suggest potential benefits. To reconcile these mixed findings, we make a case for studying differences across aid sectors and levels of analysis. Our cross-national time-series analysis of data from 141 countries suggests aid fragmentation promotes child survival and improves governance. However, just looking across countries has the potential to blur important within-country differences. We analyse subnational variation in Sierra Leone and Nigeria and find that the presence of more donors is associated with worse health outcomes, but better governance outcomes. This suggests that having more donors within a locality can be beneficial when they are working to improve the systems through which policies are implemented, but harmful when they target policy outcomes directly. A survey of Nigerian civil servants highlights potential mechanisms. Fragmentation in health aid may undermine civil servants’ morale, whereas diversity in governance aid can promote meritocratic behaviour.

La nueva estrategia de la UE para Rusia: un equilibrio de debilidad

Real Instituto Elcano - Fri, 07/05/2021 - 13:33
Mira Milosevich-Juaristi. ARI 53/2021 - 7/7/2021

La nueva estrategia de la UE para Rusia será un equilibrio de debilidad.

Escalation in the Kyrgyz-Tajik Borderlands

SWP - Fri, 07/05/2021 - 00:00

A conflict over water escalated at the end of April into the most serious border clashes between Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan since independence in 1991. By 1 May, 36 deaths had been reported on the Kyrgyz and 16 on the Tajik side, with more than two hundred injured and dozens of homes destroyed.

This was not the first outbreak of armed violence in the contested territories of the Ferghana valley, whose densely populated oases depend on scarce water sources for irrigation. The administrative boundaries in this multi-ethnic area were drawn during Soviet times and have been disputed ever since. When the former Soviet republics of Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan gained independence in 1991, delimitation of what were now international borders became a major issue, and has been the subject of negotiations ever since. Almost half of the 970-kilometre Tajik-Kyrgyz border remains contested, with large sections neither demarcated nor controlled by border posts. It is here, in the mountains between Batken in Kyrgyzstan and Isfara in Tajikistan, that the most recent violence occurred. Although Kyrgyz and Tajiks have coexisted for generations here, population growth and increasing scarcity of arable land and water have raised tensions, resulting in occasional violence between inhabitants of the border zone.

The conflict dynamic

This time, the bone of contention was the installation by Tajik workers of a surveillance camera at a joint water supply station situated on Kyrgyz territory, to monitor the distribution of water between the two sides. The distribution is governed by bilateral agreements, but the Tajiks apparently believed that the Kyrgyz were exceeding their allocation. While Kyrgyzstan had earlier installed its own camera at that water station, the Tajik move was perceived as a provocation and a Kyrgyz local official, accompanied by law enforcement and an angry crowd, demanded the removal of the Tajik camera. The situation quickly escalated to involve more than a hundred participants on each side – including border guards using hunting rifles, handguns and by some accounts even light military weapons, including mortars. A similar but much smaller incident occurred in September 2019, and clashes claiming lives on both sides have become frequent over the past decade. The drivers of violence are mostly economic in nature, revolving around the distribution of local resources and natural endowments. A truce was agreed on the evening of 29 April and eventually stopped the fighting which had spread further to border villages as far as 70 kilometres from the initial incident.

Historical background

While each side blames the other for starting it, the violence does not seem to have happened by accident. In February 2021, amidst fresh complaints about Tajiks illegally using land belonging to Kyrgyzstan, Kyrgyz activists demanded that the newly elected President Sapar Japarov – who advocates nationalist and populist positions – take up the border issue. Shortly afterwards, in late March, Kamchybek Tashiev, the Chairman of Kyrgyzstan’s State Committee for National Security proposed an exchange of territory involving the densely populated Tajik exclave of Vorukh. The offer was castigated by former Tajik foreign minister Hamroxon Zarifi, with officials and commentators on both sides insulting each other on social media and other outlets. A few days later, Kyrgyzstan held military exercises in its Batken region, involving as much as 2,000 soldiers, 100 tanks and armored personnel carriers; around 20 units of self-propelled artillery were also involved in the drill. On 9 April, Tajik President Emomali Rahmon paid a demonstrative visit to Vorukh and declared that exchanging the exclave for contiguous territory was out of the question.

Given this background of tensions, a heightened state of alert and military deployment on the Tajik side of the border would be expected in response to the Kyrgyz land swap proposal and the subsequent military exercise. It certainly testifies to deeply entrenched mistrust on the Tajik side. The same mistrust and suspicion characterise the Kyrgyz narrative that the recent incident was planned and that the Tajik president is heading for war with Kyrgyzstan in order to distract his nation from the ever worsening economic situation.

Limited scope for external action

The two sides have now announced that they will negotiate the demarcation of a 112 kilometre section of the border, although the details remain unclear. Given the conflicting interests and strong emotions attached to the border issue, new clashes can flare up at any time. External actors have little influence and, as things stand, a lasting solution is a remote prospect. Efforts should therefore concentrate on confidence-building along two axes: humanitarian engagement involving NGOs and Kyrgyz and Tajik communities in the border areas, and strengthening existing early warning mechanisms to help the two governments prevent future escalations. The conflict early warning framework of the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) could be employed in coordination with the two governments. The EU and UN could also contribute by training local officials in conflict resolution and crisis response. Local police should have rapid response teams ready to intervene to stop local clashes. Last but not least, the United Nations in particular should work towards resolving the underlying water resource conflict, by helping establish a “fair” distribution accepted by both sides.

Hacia un régimen europeo de control de la Inteligencia Artificial

Real Instituto Elcano - Thu, 06/05/2021 - 05:45
Andrés Ortega. ARI 52/2021 - 7/7/2021

Las propuestas de la Comisión Europea para regular la Inteligencia Artificial, prohibiendo algunas aplicaciones y limitando otras, son ambiciosas y aspiran a tener un impacto global. Tardarán en materializarse, con una dudosa efectividad.

(Not) Lost in Foresight

SWP - Thu, 06/05/2021 - 00:20

From the perspective of policymakers, planning for the many uncertainties that the future brings is a complicated task. Because of the growing complexity of global affairs, more and more information is destined to land on the desks of decision makers. State-of-the-art futures analysis structures information about conceivable events and developments, thus supporting more effective and legitimate anticipatory governance. Forecasting and foresight, the dominant analytical approaches, serve different political functions. Forecasting geopolitical events is primarily relevant for the execu­tive branch, which must act on short-term assessments. Foresight scenarios, on the other hand, significantly contribute to deliberations on the desirability of plausible mid- to long-term developments in consultative bodies such as parliaments. Both approaches should be utilized in EU policymaking.

Tschechisch-russische Zerwürfnisse nach Anschlagsvorwürfen

SWP - Thu, 06/05/2021 - 00:10

Die tschechische Regierung kündigte am 17. April an, sie werde 18 Mitarbeiter der russischen Botschaft in der Tschechischen Republik zur Ausreise auffordern. Prag wirft Moskau vor, russische Agenten seien verantwortlich für zwei Explosionen in einem Munitionslager im osttschechischen Vrbětice, die sich 2014 ereigneten. Russ­land reagierte mit der Ausweisung von 20 Botschaftsmitarbeitern, woraufhin Prag verkündete, das russische Botschaftspersonal weiter zu reduzieren. Auch hat Russ­land wohl kaum noch Chancen, beim geplanten Ausbau des Atomkraftwerks Dukovany zum Zug zu kommen. Angesichts des tiefsten bilateralen Zerwürfnisses mit Russland seit 1989 (bzw. seit der Unabhängigkeit des Landes 1993) wirbt die Tschechische Re­pub­lik nun um die Unterstützung der Verbündeten in Nato und EU. Deutschland sollte den Umgang mit Russland sowie das Thema hybride Bedrohungen zu einem sicht­baren Element des Dialogs mit Prag machen.

Tansania: Gelingt Suluhu Hassan eine Wende?

SWP - Thu, 06/05/2021 - 00:00

Am 17. März 2021 ist Tansanias Präsident John Pombe Magufuli unerwartet verstorben. Unter seiner Nachfolgerin Samia Suluhu Hassan, der bisherigen Vizepräsidentin, steht das Land vor wichtigen Richtungsentscheidungen. Ihre ersten Tage im Amt hat sie genutzt, um politische Änderungen einzuleiten. Zum einen nimmt sie Covid-19 ernst, anders als ihr Vorgänger; ein Expertenkomitee soll den Umgang des Landes mit der Pandemie überprüfen. Zum anderen werden Einschränkungen von Presse- und Meinungsfreiheit aufgehoben. Ob die neue Präsidentin ein eigenes Profil entwickeln kann und Tansania so auch regional wie international wieder an Bedeutung gewinnt, ist zwar noch offen. Doch die Zeichen stehen auf Wandel.

Karsten Neuhoff: „Strategie der Bundesregierung kann Sustainable Finance endlich voran bringen“

Die Bundesregierung hat heute eine Sustainable-Finance-Strategie vorgelegt. Dazu ein Statement von Karsten Neuhoff, Leiter der Abteilung Klimapolitik am DIW Berlin und Mitglied im Sustainable-Finance-Beirat der Bundesregierung sowie der Wissenschaftsplattform Sustainable Finance:

Sustainable Finance ist ein großes Zukunftsthema – nachhaltige Investments, grüne Anleihen und anderes mehr werden immer wichtiger. Dass hier riesige Nachhaltigkeitschancen, aber auch Risiken für die Finanz- und Realwirtschaft schlummern, wird auch in der Sustainable-Finance-Strategie der Bundesregierung deutlich. Diese Chancen und Risiken sollen durch vorausschauende Berichterstattung quantifiziert werden, damit sie von AnlegerInnen und im Risikomanagement effektiv berücksichtigt werden können. Die Strategie führt dazu 26 Maßnahmen auf, die in Deutschland, in europäischen Prozessen und in internationaler Zusammenarbeit umgesetzt werden sollten. Die gemeinsam von Wirtschafts-, Finanz- und Umweltministerium entwickelte Strategie zeigt, dass so wirtschaftliche Entwicklung, Nachhaltigkeit und Finanzmarktstabilität in Einklang gebracht werden können.

E-government and democracy in Botswana: observational and experimental evidence on the effect of e-government usage on political attitudes

This study assesses whether the use of electronic government (e-government) services affects political attitudes. The results, based on evidence generated in Botswana, indicate that e-government services can, in fact, have an impact on political attitudes. E-government services are rapidly being rolled out around the globe. Governments primarily expect efficiency gains from these reforms. Whether e-government in particular, and information and communication technology (ICT) in general, affect societies is hotly debated. There are fears that democracy may be compromised by surveillance, censorship, fake news, interference in elections and other strategies facilitated by digital tools. This discussion paper adds to the nascent literature by investigating if the expanding e-government usage in Botswana affects individual support for democracy, regime satisfaction and interpersonal trust. Methodologically, the study relies on observational and experimental evidence. The observational approach assesses the impact of the usage of different e-services such as e-payments and electronic tax return filings on political attitudes. The experimental approach incentivises taxpayers to file their tax returns electronically. Both approaches build on an original in-person survey gauging the political attitudes of 2,109 citizens in Greater Gaborone. The survey was conducted in February and March 2020. In terms of results, we do not identify a general substantive effect for the impact of all e-services on political attitudes. For some of the e-services and attitudes tested, however, we find significant evidence. Furthermore, our study yields significant results for several of the linkages between the causal steps within our causal mechanisms. For instance, we find that e-government can empower citizens to engage in political activities and that, although e-government users on average report that the government is not addressing their needs, a simple incentivising message can significantly improve people’s feelings in this regard.

E-government and democracy in Botswana: observational and experimental evidence on the effect of e-government usage on political attitudes

This study assesses whether the use of electronic government (e-government) services affects political attitudes. The results, based on evidence generated in Botswana, indicate that e-government services can, in fact, have an impact on political attitudes. E-government services are rapidly being rolled out around the globe. Governments primarily expect efficiency gains from these reforms. Whether e-government in particular, and information and communication technology (ICT) in general, affect societies is hotly debated. There are fears that democracy may be compromised by surveillance, censorship, fake news, interference in elections and other strategies facilitated by digital tools. This discussion paper adds to the nascent literature by investigating if the expanding e-government usage in Botswana affects individual support for democracy, regime satisfaction and interpersonal trust. Methodologically, the study relies on observational and experimental evidence. The observational approach assesses the impact of the usage of different e-services such as e-payments and electronic tax return filings on political attitudes. The experimental approach incentivises taxpayers to file their tax returns electronically. Both approaches build on an original in-person survey gauging the political attitudes of 2,109 citizens in Greater Gaborone. The survey was conducted in February and March 2020. In terms of results, we do not identify a general substantive effect for the impact of all e-services on political attitudes. For some of the e-services and attitudes tested, however, we find significant evidence. Furthermore, our study yields significant results for several of the linkages between the causal steps within our causal mechanisms. For instance, we find that e-government can empower citizens to engage in political activities and that, although e-government users on average report that the government is not addressing their needs, a simple incentivising message can significantly improve people’s feelings in this regard.

E-government and democracy in Botswana: observational and experimental evidence on the effect of e-government usage on political attitudes

This study assesses whether the use of electronic government (e-government) services affects political attitudes. The results, based on evidence generated in Botswana, indicate that e-government services can, in fact, have an impact on political attitudes. E-government services are rapidly being rolled out around the globe. Governments primarily expect efficiency gains from these reforms. Whether e-government in particular, and information and communication technology (ICT) in general, affect societies is hotly debated. There are fears that democracy may be compromised by surveillance, censorship, fake news, interference in elections and other strategies facilitated by digital tools. This discussion paper adds to the nascent literature by investigating if the expanding e-government usage in Botswana affects individual support for democracy, regime satisfaction and interpersonal trust. Methodologically, the study relies on observational and experimental evidence. The observational approach assesses the impact of the usage of different e-services such as e-payments and electronic tax return filings on political attitudes. The experimental approach incentivises taxpayers to file their tax returns electronically. Both approaches build on an original in-person survey gauging the political attitudes of 2,109 citizens in Greater Gaborone. The survey was conducted in February and March 2020. In terms of results, we do not identify a general substantive effect for the impact of all e-services on political attitudes. For some of the e-services and attitudes tested, however, we find significant evidence. Furthermore, our study yields significant results for several of the linkages between the causal steps within our causal mechanisms. For instance, we find that e-government can empower citizens to engage in political activities and that, although e-government users on average report that the government is not addressing their needs, a simple incentivising message can significantly improve people’s feelings in this regard.

Wie COVID-19 die Vorteile einer Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit aufzeigt

Als Nebenprodukt der Pandemie ist in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit ein einmaliges globales Experiment in Gang gekommen. Aus vielen Länderbüros des globalen Südens wurden 2020 die internationalen Mitarbeiter*innen abgezogen und in ihre Heimatzentralen in Europa und Nordamerika zurückbeordert. Die betroffenen Entwicklungsprogramme kamen dadurch jedoch nicht unbedingt ins Stocken. In einigen Fällen ist sogar das Gegenteil zu beobachten. So zeigt eine gemeinsame Studie internationaler Nichtregierungsorganisationen und der australischen La Trobe University, dass der Rückzug internationaler Mitarbeiter*innen aus Programmen in Ozeanien den Entscheidungsspielraum für lokale Akteure erheblich erweitert hat. Die Vorteile einer solchen Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit sollten in der Diskussion um zukünftige Ansätze der staatlichen und nichtstaatlichen Entwicklungszusammenarbeit berücksichtigt werden.

Der öffentliche Fokus liegt derzeit vor allem auf der Not und den wirtschaftlichen Schäden, die die COVID-19-Pandemie verursacht. So werden die Entwicklungserfolge vieler Länder des globalen Südens sowie der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit in den vergangenen Jahrzehnten zunichte gemacht. Auch die global vereinbarten Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (SDGs) sind kaum noch im vorgesehenen Zeitplan zu erreichen. Trotz alledem kann die Entwicklungszusammenarbeit von den lokalen Reaktionen auf die Pandemie auch lernen. Die oben genannte Studie ist dafür ein gutes Beispiel. Sie zeigt, dass infolge des Rückzugs internationaler Mitarbeiter*innen aus Entwicklungsprogrammen lokale Expertise und Netzwerke stärker genutzt wurden, die Zusammenarbeit zwischen lokalen Akteuren zunahm, Hierarchien abgebaut wurden und die Entscheidungsfindung insgesamt dezentralisiert wurde. Über die lokalen Mitarbeiter*innen der Entwicklungsorganisationen und ihre Partnerorganisationen hinaus konnten auch Akteur*innen auf nationaler Ebene die Prioritäten wieder stärker mitbestimmen, da sie die Agenda nicht wie zuvor von internationalen Expert*innen dominiert sahen. Gemäß dieser Bestandsaufnahme haben die veränderten Rahmenbedingungen in der Pandemie, die in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit oft schwer zu erreichende Ownership, also die nationale und lokale Verantwortung und das Engagement für Entwicklungsmaßnahmen, indirekt gestärkt.

Die Diskussion um die Vorteile dieser Lokalisierung, die in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit meist unter dem Stichwort „Partizipation“ geführt wird, wurde in den vergangenen Jahren vor allem in der Nothilfe geführt. „Lokalisierung“ meint die stärkere Übergabe von Entscheidungsgewalt und Ressourcen von internationalen Organisationen an lokale Akteure. Eine Untersuchung von Nothilfeprojekten über einen Zeitraum von drei Jahren bestätigt, dass diese durch stärkere Lokalisierung durchaus bessere Ergebnisse erzielten. So waren lokal angeleitete Maßnahmen zum Schutz von Flüchtlingen in Grenzregionen in Myanmar und Tunesien beispielsweise deutlich besser darin, informelle Ressourcen der Menschen wie Verwandtschafts- und Bekanntschaftsnetzwerke einzubeziehen als internationale Initiativen. Die Untersuchung zeigt darüber hinaus auf, dass viele mit einer stärkeren Lokalisierung verbundene Befürchtungen unbegründet waren und dass der wesentliche Hinderungsgrund für eine stärkere Lokalisierung die Weigerung internationaler Organisationen war, Macht abzugeben. Auch in der Entwicklungsforschung setzt sich zunehmend die Erkenntnis durch, dass eine zu starke Steuerung durch Entwicklungsorganisationen das Entstehen von Ownership verhindern und die Wirksamkeit von Projekten reduzieren kann. Daher sind neue Ansätze notwendig, die lokale Entscheidungen, das Einfließen lokaler Expertise sowie die Entwicklung lokal angepasster Lösungswege stärker ermöglichen und fördern.

Ein Ansatz, der sich in der Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit bereits bewährt hat, ist Problem Driven Iterative Adaptation (PDIA; problemgeleitete schrittweise Anpassung). Dieser Ansatz basiert auf der Analyse fehlgeschlagener Entwicklungsprojekte am Harvard Center for International Development. Lokale Partner wie Ministerien werden dabei nachfrageorientiert angeleitet, eigenständig Entwicklungsprobleme zu analysieren und auf Basis ihrer lokalen Expertise Lösungsstrategien zu entwickeln, die auf den jeweiligen Kontext zugeschnitten sind. Die lokalen Partner sind in diesem Prozess auch verantwortlich für die Umsetzung der vereinbarten Lösungsschritte. In wiederkehrenden Treffen tauschen sie sich über Fortschritte und Fehlschläge aus und passen die Vorgehensweise entsprechend an. Dabei lernen sie nicht nur mehr über konkrete Reformen, sondern entwickeln auch eine grundsätzliche Problemlösungskompetenz, die sie zukünftig eigenständig anwenden können. Somit ist PDIA ein möglicher Ansatz, um die Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, deren Vorteile durch die Pandemie deutlich geworden sind, stärker zu institutionalisieren. Dadurch könnte Entwicklungszusammenarbeit künftig nicht nur wirklich partizipativer, sondern möglicherweise auch wirksamer und nachhaltiger werden.

Michael Roll ist  Soziologe und Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter im Forschungsprogramm „Transformation politischer (Un-)Ordnung

Tim Kornprobst ist Teilnehmer des 56. Kurses des Postgraduierten-Programms am Deutschen Institut für Entwicklungspolitik. Er ist Koautor der Publikation Postkolonialismus & Post-Development: Praktische Perspektiven für die Entwicklungszusammenarbeit des Stipendiatischen Arbeitskreises Globale Entwicklung und postkoloniale Verhältnisse der Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES).

Wie COVID-19 die Vorteile einer Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit aufzeigt

Als Nebenprodukt der Pandemie ist in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit ein einmaliges globales Experiment in Gang gekommen. Aus vielen Länderbüros des globalen Südens wurden 2020 die internationalen Mitarbeiter*innen abgezogen und in ihre Heimatzentralen in Europa und Nordamerika zurückbeordert. Die betroffenen Entwicklungsprogramme kamen dadurch jedoch nicht unbedingt ins Stocken. In einigen Fällen ist sogar das Gegenteil zu beobachten. So zeigt eine gemeinsame Studie internationaler Nichtregierungsorganisationen und der australischen La Trobe University, dass der Rückzug internationaler Mitarbeiter*innen aus Programmen in Ozeanien den Entscheidungsspielraum für lokale Akteure erheblich erweitert hat. Die Vorteile einer solchen Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit sollten in der Diskussion um zukünftige Ansätze der staatlichen und nichtstaatlichen Entwicklungszusammenarbeit berücksichtigt werden.

Der öffentliche Fokus liegt derzeit vor allem auf der Not und den wirtschaftlichen Schäden, die die COVID-19-Pandemie verursacht. So werden die Entwicklungserfolge vieler Länder des globalen Südens sowie der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit in den vergangenen Jahrzehnten zunichte gemacht. Auch die global vereinbarten Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (SDGs) sind kaum noch im vorgesehenen Zeitplan zu erreichen. Trotz alledem kann die Entwicklungszusammenarbeit von den lokalen Reaktionen auf die Pandemie auch lernen. Die oben genannte Studie ist dafür ein gutes Beispiel. Sie zeigt, dass infolge des Rückzugs internationaler Mitarbeiter*innen aus Entwicklungsprogrammen lokale Expertise und Netzwerke stärker genutzt wurden, die Zusammenarbeit zwischen lokalen Akteuren zunahm, Hierarchien abgebaut wurden und die Entscheidungsfindung insgesamt dezentralisiert wurde. Über die lokalen Mitarbeiter*innen der Entwicklungsorganisationen und ihre Partnerorganisationen hinaus konnten auch Akteur*innen auf nationaler Ebene die Prioritäten wieder stärker mitbestimmen, da sie die Agenda nicht wie zuvor von internationalen Expert*innen dominiert sahen. Gemäß dieser Bestandsaufnahme haben die veränderten Rahmenbedingungen in der Pandemie, die in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit oft schwer zu erreichende Ownership, also die nationale und lokale Verantwortung und das Engagement für Entwicklungsmaßnahmen, indirekt gestärkt.

Die Diskussion um die Vorteile dieser Lokalisierung, die in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit meist unter dem Stichwort „Partizipation“ geführt wird, wurde in den vergangenen Jahren vor allem in der Nothilfe geführt. „Lokalisierung“ meint die stärkere Übergabe von Entscheidungsgewalt und Ressourcen von internationalen Organisationen an lokale Akteure. Eine Untersuchung von Nothilfeprojekten über einen Zeitraum von drei Jahren bestätigt, dass diese durch stärkere Lokalisierung durchaus bessere Ergebnisse erzielten. So waren lokal angeleitete Maßnahmen zum Schutz von Flüchtlingen in Grenzregionen in Myanmar und Tunesien beispielsweise deutlich besser darin, informelle Ressourcen der Menschen wie Verwandtschafts- und Bekanntschaftsnetzwerke einzubeziehen als internationale Initiativen. Die Untersuchung zeigt darüber hinaus auf, dass viele mit einer stärkeren Lokalisierung verbundene Befürchtungen unbegründet waren und dass der wesentliche Hinderungsgrund für eine stärkere Lokalisierung die Weigerung internationaler Organisationen war, Macht abzugeben. Auch in der Entwicklungsforschung setzt sich zunehmend die Erkenntnis durch, dass eine zu starke Steuerung durch Entwicklungsorganisationen das Entstehen von Ownership verhindern und die Wirksamkeit von Projekten reduzieren kann. Daher sind neue Ansätze notwendig, die lokale Entscheidungen, das Einfließen lokaler Expertise sowie die Entwicklung lokal angepasster Lösungswege stärker ermöglichen und fördern.

Ein Ansatz, der sich in der Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit bereits bewährt hat, ist Problem Driven Iterative Adaptation (PDIA; problemgeleitete schrittweise Anpassung). Dieser Ansatz basiert auf der Analyse fehlgeschlagener Entwicklungsprojekte am Harvard Center for International Development. Lokale Partner wie Ministerien werden dabei nachfrageorientiert angeleitet, eigenständig Entwicklungsprobleme zu analysieren und auf Basis ihrer lokalen Expertise Lösungsstrategien zu entwickeln, die auf den jeweiligen Kontext zugeschnitten sind. Die lokalen Partner sind in diesem Prozess auch verantwortlich für die Umsetzung der vereinbarten Lösungsschritte. In wiederkehrenden Treffen tauschen sie sich über Fortschritte und Fehlschläge aus und passen die Vorgehensweise entsprechend an. Dabei lernen sie nicht nur mehr über konkrete Reformen, sondern entwickeln auch eine grundsätzliche Problemlösungskompetenz, die sie zukünftig eigenständig anwenden können. Somit ist PDIA ein möglicher Ansatz, um die Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, deren Vorteile durch die Pandemie deutlich geworden sind, stärker zu institutionalisieren. Dadurch könnte Entwicklungszusammenarbeit künftig nicht nur wirklich partizipativer, sondern möglicherweise auch wirksamer und nachhaltiger werden.

Michael Roll ist  Soziologe und Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter im Forschungsprogramm „Transformation politischer (Un-)Ordnung

Tim Kornprobst ist Teilnehmer des 56. Kurses des Postgraduierten-Programms am Deutschen Institut für Entwicklungspolitik. Er ist Koautor der Publikation Postkolonialismus & Post-Development: Praktische Perspektiven für die Entwicklungszusammenarbeit des Stipendiatischen Arbeitskreises Globale Entwicklung und postkoloniale Verhältnisse der Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES).

Wie COVID-19 die Vorteile einer Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit aufzeigt

Als Nebenprodukt der Pandemie ist in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit ein einmaliges globales Experiment in Gang gekommen. Aus vielen Länderbüros des globalen Südens wurden 2020 die internationalen Mitarbeiter*innen abgezogen und in ihre Heimatzentralen in Europa und Nordamerika zurückbeordert. Die betroffenen Entwicklungsprogramme kamen dadurch jedoch nicht unbedingt ins Stocken. In einigen Fällen ist sogar das Gegenteil zu beobachten. So zeigt eine gemeinsame Studie internationaler Nichtregierungsorganisationen und der australischen La Trobe University, dass der Rückzug internationaler Mitarbeiter*innen aus Programmen in Ozeanien den Entscheidungsspielraum für lokale Akteure erheblich erweitert hat. Die Vorteile einer solchen Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit sollten in der Diskussion um zukünftige Ansätze der staatlichen und nichtstaatlichen Entwicklungszusammenarbeit berücksichtigt werden.

Der öffentliche Fokus liegt derzeit vor allem auf der Not und den wirtschaftlichen Schäden, die die COVID-19-Pandemie verursacht. So werden die Entwicklungserfolge vieler Länder des globalen Südens sowie der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit in den vergangenen Jahrzehnten zunichte gemacht. Auch die global vereinbarten Ziele für nachhaltige Entwicklung (SDGs) sind kaum noch im vorgesehenen Zeitplan zu erreichen. Trotz alledem kann die Entwicklungszusammenarbeit von den lokalen Reaktionen auf die Pandemie auch lernen. Die oben genannte Studie ist dafür ein gutes Beispiel. Sie zeigt, dass infolge des Rückzugs internationaler Mitarbeiter*innen aus Entwicklungsprogrammen lokale Expertise und Netzwerke stärker genutzt wurden, die Zusammenarbeit zwischen lokalen Akteuren zunahm, Hierarchien abgebaut wurden und die Entscheidungsfindung insgesamt dezentralisiert wurde. Über die lokalen Mitarbeiter*innen der Entwicklungsorganisationen und ihre Partnerorganisationen hinaus konnten auch Akteur*innen auf nationaler Ebene die Prioritäten wieder stärker mitbestimmen, da sie die Agenda nicht wie zuvor von internationalen Expert*innen dominiert sahen. Gemäß dieser Bestandsaufnahme haben die veränderten Rahmenbedingungen in der Pandemie, die in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit oft schwer zu erreichende Ownership, also die nationale und lokale Verantwortung und das Engagement für Entwicklungsmaßnahmen, indirekt gestärkt.

Die Diskussion um die Vorteile dieser Lokalisierung, die in der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit meist unter dem Stichwort „Partizipation“ geführt wird, wurde in den vergangenen Jahren vor allem in der Nothilfe geführt. „Lokalisierung“ meint die stärkere Übergabe von Entscheidungsgewalt und Ressourcen von internationalen Organisationen an lokale Akteure. Eine Untersuchung von Nothilfeprojekten über einen Zeitraum von drei Jahren bestätigt, dass diese durch stärkere Lokalisierung durchaus bessere Ergebnisse erzielten. So waren lokal angeleitete Maßnahmen zum Schutz von Flüchtlingen in Grenzregionen in Myanmar und Tunesien beispielsweise deutlich besser darin, informelle Ressourcen der Menschen wie Verwandtschafts- und Bekanntschaftsnetzwerke einzubeziehen als internationale Initiativen. Die Untersuchung zeigt darüber hinaus auf, dass viele mit einer stärkeren Lokalisierung verbundene Befürchtungen unbegründet waren und dass der wesentliche Hinderungsgrund für eine stärkere Lokalisierung die Weigerung internationaler Organisationen war, Macht abzugeben. Auch in der Entwicklungsforschung setzt sich zunehmend die Erkenntnis durch, dass eine zu starke Steuerung durch Entwicklungsorganisationen das Entstehen von Ownership verhindern und die Wirksamkeit von Projekten reduzieren kann. Daher sind neue Ansätze notwendig, die lokale Entscheidungen, das Einfließen lokaler Expertise sowie die Entwicklung lokal angepasster Lösungswege stärker ermöglichen und fördern.

Ein Ansatz, der sich in der Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit bereits bewährt hat, ist Problem Driven Iterative Adaptation (PDIA; problemgeleitete schrittweise Anpassung). Dieser Ansatz basiert auf der Analyse fehlgeschlagener Entwicklungsprojekte am Harvard Center for International Development. Lokale Partner wie Ministerien werden dabei nachfrageorientiert angeleitet, eigenständig Entwicklungsprobleme zu analysieren und auf Basis ihrer lokalen Expertise Lösungsstrategien zu entwickeln, die auf den jeweiligen Kontext zugeschnitten sind. Die lokalen Partner sind in diesem Prozess auch verantwortlich für die Umsetzung der vereinbarten Lösungsschritte. In wiederkehrenden Treffen tauschen sie sich über Fortschritte und Fehlschläge aus und passen die Vorgehensweise entsprechend an. Dabei lernen sie nicht nur mehr über konkrete Reformen, sondern entwickeln auch eine grundsätzliche Problemlösungskompetenz, die sie zukünftig eigenständig anwenden können. Somit ist PDIA ein möglicher Ansatz, um die Lokalisierung der Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, deren Vorteile durch die Pandemie deutlich geworden sind, stärker zu institutionalisieren. Dadurch könnte Entwicklungszusammenarbeit künftig nicht nur wirklich partizipativer, sondern möglicherweise auch wirksamer und nachhaltiger werden.

Michael Roll ist  Soziologe und Wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter im Forschungsprogramm „Transformation politischer (Un-)Ordnung

Tim Kornprobst ist Teilnehmer des 56. Kurses des Postgraduierten-Programms am Deutschen Institut für Entwicklungspolitik. Er ist Koautor der Publikation Postkolonialismus & Post-Development: Praktische Perspektiven für die Entwicklungszusammenarbeit des Stipendiatischen Arbeitskreises Globale Entwicklung und postkoloniale Verhältnisse der Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung (FES).

Unmasking the middle class in the Philippines: aspirations, lifestyles, and prospects for sustainable consumption

The lifestyles of the growing middle classes in the Philippines have a potentially significant impact on the environment. To what extent and how this happens depends on the attitudes, aspirations and actual consumption practices of the middle classes. Environmental knowledge, environmental concern, wealth and international experience present the key concepts for the exploratory analysis of consumer behaviour. This contribution draws on a unique combination of quantitative and qualitative data, using national and city-level household surveys as well as insights from focus group discussions. The study finds that higher wealth levels and environmental concern influence reported energy saving behaviours. Younger, female and environmentally concerned consumers also tend to choose more sustainable modes of transport, but the correlation is weak. Overall, more carbon intensive, unsustainable consumption patterns can be expected as households move up the socioeconomic ladder. While the middle classes score fairly highly on the measurement scales of environmental concern and knowledge, education, savings and income security matter more to them in day-to-day life. For prospective sustainable consumption policies, our results imply that more action that draws on behavioural insights is needed to overcome the knowledge–action gap.

Unmasking the middle class in the Philippines: aspirations, lifestyles, and prospects for sustainable consumption

The lifestyles of the growing middle classes in the Philippines have a potentially significant impact on the environment. To what extent and how this happens depends on the attitudes, aspirations and actual consumption practices of the middle classes. Environmental knowledge, environmental concern, wealth and international experience present the key concepts for the exploratory analysis of consumer behaviour. This contribution draws on a unique combination of quantitative and qualitative data, using national and city-level household surveys as well as insights from focus group discussions. The study finds that higher wealth levels and environmental concern influence reported energy saving behaviours. Younger, female and environmentally concerned consumers also tend to choose more sustainable modes of transport, but the correlation is weak. Overall, more carbon intensive, unsustainable consumption patterns can be expected as households move up the socioeconomic ladder. While the middle classes score fairly highly on the measurement scales of environmental concern and knowledge, education, savings and income security matter more to them in day-to-day life. For prospective sustainable consumption policies, our results imply that more action that draws on behavioural insights is needed to overcome the knowledge–action gap.

Unmasking the middle class in the Philippines: aspirations, lifestyles, and prospects for sustainable consumption

The lifestyles of the growing middle classes in the Philippines have a potentially significant impact on the environment. To what extent and how this happens depends on the attitudes, aspirations and actual consumption practices of the middle classes. Environmental knowledge, environmental concern, wealth and international experience present the key concepts for the exploratory analysis of consumer behaviour. This contribution draws on a unique combination of quantitative and qualitative data, using national and city-level household surveys as well as insights from focus group discussions. The study finds that higher wealth levels and environmental concern influence reported energy saving behaviours. Younger, female and environmentally concerned consumers also tend to choose more sustainable modes of transport, but the correlation is weak. Overall, more carbon intensive, unsustainable consumption patterns can be expected as households move up the socioeconomic ladder. While the middle classes score fairly highly on the measurement scales of environmental concern and knowledge, education, savings and income security matter more to them in day-to-day life. For prospective sustainable consumption policies, our results imply that more action that draws on behavioural insights is needed to overcome the knowledge–action gap.

Pages